c# net qr code generator UTF-16 ----C9 00 63 00 6F 00 75 00 74 00 65 00 2D 00 6D 00 6F 00 69 00 21 00 in C#.NET

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UTF-16 ----C9 00 63 00 6F 00 75 00 74 00 65 00 2D 00 6D 00 6F 00 69 00 21 00
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But remember that each UTF-16 code point is represented by a 16-bit value, so we need to think of each pair of bytes as a character. So, our second character is 63 00. This is the 16-bit hex value 0x0063, represented in the little-endian form. That means we get the least-significant byte (LSB) first, followed by the most-significant byte (MSB). For good (but now largely historical) reasons of engineering efficiency, the Intel x86 family is natively a little-endian architecture. It always expects the LSB followed by the MSB, so the default Unicode encoding is little-endian. On the other hand, platforms like the 680x0 series used in classic Macs are big-endian they expect the MSB, followed by the LSB. Some chip architectures (like the later versions of the ARM chip used in most phones) can even be switched between flavors!
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Another historical note: one of your authors is big-endian (he used the Z80 and 68000 when he was a baby developer) and the other is little endian (he used the 6502, and early pre-endian-switching versions of the ARM when he was growing up). Consequently, one of us has felt like every memory dump he s looked at since about 1995 has been backwards . The other takes the contrarian position that it s so-called normal numbers that are written backwards. So take a deep breath and count to 01.
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Should you need to communicate with something that expects its UTF-16 in a bigendian byte array, you can ask for it. Replace the line in Example 10-84 that initializes the utf16Bytes variable with the code in Example 10-85.
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byte[] utf16Bytes = Encoding.BigEndianUnicode.GetBytes(listenUpFR);
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As you might expect, we get the following output:
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UTF-16 -----00 C9 00 63 00 6F 00 75 00 74 00 65 00 2D 00 6D 00 6F 00 69 00 21
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And let s try it once more, but with Arabic text, as Example 10-86 shows.
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static void Main(string[] args) { string listenUpArabic = " ;" byte[] utf16Bytes = Encoding.BigEndianUnicode.GetBytes(listenUpArabic); Console.WriteLine("UTF-16"); Console.WriteLine("-----"); foreach (var encodedByte in utf16Bytes) { Console.Write(string.Format("{0:X2}", encodedByte));
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} }
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Console.Write(" ");
Console.ReadKey();
And our output is:
UTF-16 ----06 23 06 46 06 35 06 2A 00 20 06 25 06 44 06 4A 06 51
(Just to prove that you do get values bigger than 0xFF in Unicode!)
Why Represent Strings As Byte Sequences
In the course of the chapters on file I/O ( 11) and networking ( 13), we re going to see a number of communications and storage APIs that deal with writing arrays of bytes to some kind of target device. The byte format in which those strings go down the wires is clearly very important, and, while the framework default choices are often appropriate, knowing how (and why) you might need to choose a different encoding will ensure that you re equipped to deal with mysterious bugs especially when wrangling text in a language other than your own, or to/from a non-Windows platform.
Summary
In this chapter, we delved into the workings of strings, looking at the difference between the immutable String and its mutable cousin, StringBuilder. We saw how to convert other data types to and from strings, and how to control that formatting, especially when we consider cultures and languages other than our own. We saw the various ways in which we can compose strings, and the performance tradeoffs of each technique. Finally, we looked at how strings are actually represented in memory, and how we may need to convert between different encodings for different applications, platforms, and configurations.
Yes, other platforms do exist.
Files and Streams
Almost all programmers have to deal with storing, retrieving, and processing information in files at some time or another. The .NET Framework provides a number of classes and methods we can use to find, create, read, and write files and directories In this chapter we ll look at some of the most common. Files, though, are just one example of a broader group of entities that can be opened, read from, and/or written to in a sequential fashion, and then closed. .NET defines a common contract, called a stream, that is offered by all types that can be used in this way. We ll see how and why we might access a file through a stream, and then we ll look at some other types of streams, including a special storage medium called isolated storage which lets us save and load information even when we are in a lower-trust environment (such as the Silverlight sandbox). Finally, we ll look at some of the other stream implementations in .NET by way of comparison. (Streams crop up in all sorts of places, so this chapter won t be the last we see of them they re important in networking, for example.)
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