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CHAPTER 11 WEB APPLICATIONS
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web applications by selecting and configuring a middleware stack that got the application's boilerplate logic out of the way. Python web frameworks are crucial to modern web development. They handle much of the logic of HTTP, and they also provide several important abstractions: they can dispatch different URLs to different Python code, insert Python variables into HTML templates, and provide important assistance in both persisting Python objects to the database and also in letting them be accessed from the web both through user-facing CRUD interfaces as well as RESTful web-service protocols. There do exist pure-Python web servers, which can be especially important when writing a web interface for a program that users will install locally. There are not only good choices available for download, but a few small servers are even built into the Python Standard Library. Two old approaches to dynamic web page generation are the CGI protocol and the mod_python Apache module. Neither should be used for new development.
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C H A P T E R 12
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The early e-mail protocols were among the first network dialects developed for the Internet. The world was a simple one in those days: everyone with access to the Internet reached it through a command-line account on an Internet-connected machine. There, at the command line, they would type out e-mails to their friends, and then they could check their in-boxes when new mail arrived. The entire task of an email protocol was to transmit messages from one big Internet server to another, whenever someone sent mail to a friend whose shell account happened to be on a different machine. Today the situation is much more complicated: not only is the network involved in moving e-mail between servers, but it is often also the tool with which people check and send e-mail. I am not talking merely about webmail services, like Google Mail; those are really just the modern versions of the command-line shell accounts of yesteryear, because the mail that Google s web service displays in your browser is still being stored on one of Google s big servers. Instead, a more complicated situation arises when someone uses an e-mail client like Mozilla Thunderbird or Microsoft Outlook that, unlike Gmail, is running locally on their desktop or laptop. In this case of a local e-mail client, the network is involved in three different ways as a message is transmitted and received: First, the e-mail client program submits the message to a server on the Internet on which the sender has an e-mail account. This usually takes place over Authenticated SMTP, which we will learn about in 13. Next, that e-mail server finds and connects to the server named as the destination of the e-mail message the server in charge of the domain named after the @ sign. This conversation takes place over normal, vanilla, un-authenticated SMTP. Again, 13 is where you should go for details. Finally, the recipient uses Thunderbird or Outlook to connect to his or her e-mail server and discover that someone has sent a new message. This could take place over any of several protocols probably over an older protocol called POP, which we cover in 14, but perhaps over the modern IMAP protocol to which we dedicate 15.
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You will note that all of these e-mail protocols are discussed in the subsequent chapters of this book. What, then, is the purpose of this chapter Here, we will learn about the actual payload that is carried by all of the aforementioned protocols: the format of e-mail messages themselves.
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CHAPTER 12 E-MAIL COMPOSITION AND DECODING
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We will start by looking at how old-fashioned, plain-text e-mail messages work, of the kind that were first sent on the ancient Internet. Then, we will learn about the innovations and extensions to this format that today let e-mail messages support sophisticated formats, like HTML, and that let them include attachments that might contain images or other binary data.
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Caution The email module described in this chapter has improved several times through its history, making leaps forward in Python versions 2.2.2, 2.4, and 2.5. Like the rest of this book, this chapter focuses on Python 2.5 and later. If you need to use older versions of the email module, first read this chapter, and then consult the Standard Library documentation for the older version of Python that you are using to see the ways in which its email module differed from the modern one described here.
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Each traditional e-mail message contains two distinct parts: headers and the body. Here is a very simple e-mail message so that you can see what the two sections look like: From: Jane Smith <jsmith@example.com> To: Alan Jones <ajones@example.com> Subject: Testing This E-Mail Thing Hello Alan, This is just a test message. Thanks. The first section is called the headers, which contain all of the metadata about the message, like the sender, the destination, and the subject of the message everything except the text of the message itself. The body then follows and contains the message text itself. There are three basic rules of Internet e-mail formatting: At least during actual transmission, every line of an e-mail message should be terminated by the two-character sequence carriage return, newline, represented in Python by '\r\n'. E-mail clients running on your laptop or desktop machine tend to make different decisions about whether to store messages in this format, or replace these two-character line endings with whatever ending is native to your operating system. The first few lines of an e-mail are headers, which consist of a header name, a colon, a space, and a value. A header can be several lines long by indenting the second and following lines from the left margin as a signal that they belong to the header above them. The headers end with a blank line (that is, by two line endings back-to-back without intervening text) and then the message body is everything else that follows. The body is also sometimes called the payload.
The preceding example shows only a very minimal set of headers, like a message might contain when an e-mail client first sends it. However, as soon as it is sent, the mail server will likely add a Date header, a Received header, and possibly many more. Most mail readers do not display all the headers of
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