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CHAPTER 15 IMAP
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Given these rules, you can see how a recursive routine like display_structure() in Listing 15 7 is perfect for unwinding and displaying the hierarchy of parts in a message. When the IMAP server returns a BODYSTRUCTURE, the routine goes to work and prints out something like this for examination by the user: Folder INBOX - type a message UID, or "q" to quit: 2701 Flags: \Seen HEADER TEXT multipart/mixed 1 multipart/alternative 1.1 text/plain size=253 1.2 text/html size=508 2 application/octet-stream size=5448 ATTACHMENT FILENAME='test.py' Message 2701 - type a part name, or "q" to quit: You can see that the message whose structure is shown here is a quite typical modern e-mail, with a fancy rich-text HTML portion for users who view it in a browser or modern e-mail client, and a plain-text version of the same message for people using more traditional devices or applications. It also contains a file attachment, complete with a suggested file name in case the user wants to download it to the local filesystem. Our sample program does not attempt to save anything to the hard drive, both for simplicity and safety; instead, the user can select any portion of the message such as the special sections HEADER and TEXT, or one of the specific parts like 1.1 and its content will be printed to the screen. If you examine the program listing, you will see that all of this is supported simply by calls to the IMAP fetch() method. Part names like HEADER and 1.1 are simply more options for what you can specify when you call fetch(), and can be used right alongside other values like BODY.PEEK and FLAGS. The only difference is that the latter values work for all messages, whereas a part name like 2.1.3 would exist only for multipart messages whose structure included a part with that designation. One oddity you will note is that the IMAP protocol does not actually provide you with any of the multipart names that a particular message supports! Instead, you have to count the number of parts listed in the BODYSTRUCTURE starting with the index 1 in order to determine which part number you should ask for. You can see that our display_structure() routine here uses a simple loop to accomplish this counting. One final note about the fetch() command: it lets you not only pull just the parts of a message that you need at any given moment, but also truncate them in case they are quite long and you just want to provide an excerpt from the beginning to tantalize the user! To use this feature, follow any part name with a slice in angle brackets that indicates what range of characters you want it works very much like Python s slice operation: BODY[]<0.100> That would return the first 100 bytes of the message body. This can let you inspect both text and the beginning of an attachment to learn more about its content before letting the user decide whether to select or download it.
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Flagging and Deleting Messages
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You might have noticed, while trying out Listing 15 7 or reading its example output just shown, that IMAP marks messages with attributes called flags, which typically take the form of a backslashprefixed word, like \Seen for one of the messages just cited. Several of these are standard, and are defined in RFC 3501 for use on all IMAP servers. Here is what the most important ones mean: \Answered: The user has replied to the message. \Draft: The user has not finished composing the message.
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CHAPTER 15 IMAP
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\Flagged: The message has somehow been singled out specially; the purpose and meaning of this flag vary between mail readers. \Recent: No IMAP client has seen this message before. This flag is unique, in that the flag cannot be added or removed by normal commands; it is automatically removed after the mailbox is selected. \Seen: The message has been read.
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As you can see, these flags correspond roughly to the information that many mail readers visually present about each message. While the terminology may differ (many clients talk about new rather than not seen messages), the meaning is broadly understood. Particular servers may also support other flags, and those flags do not necessarily begin with the backslash. Also, the \Recent flag is not reliably supported by all servers, so general-purpose IMAP clients can treat it only as, at best, a hint. The IMAPClient library supports several methods for working with flags. The simplest retrieves the flags as though you had done a fetch() asking for 'FLAGS', but goes ahead and removes the dictionary around each answer: >>> c.get_flags(2703) {2703: ('\\Seen',)} There are also calls to add and remove flags from a message: c.remove_flags(2703, ['\\Seen']) c.add_flags(2703, ['\\Answered']) In case you want to completely change the set of flags for a particular message without figuring out the correct series of adds and removes, you can use set_flags() to unilaterally replace the whole list of message flags with a new one: c.set_flags(2703, ['\\Seen', '\\Answered']) Any of these operations can take a list of message UIDs instead of the single UID shown in these examples.
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