.net qr code TELNET AND SSH in Font

Drawing QR Code in Font TELNET AND SSH

CHAPTER 16 TELNET AND SSH
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Remote-shell protocols let you connect to remove machines, run shell commands, and see their output, just like the commands were running inside a local terminal window. Sometimes you use these protocols to connect to an actual Unix shell, and sometimes to small embedded shells in routers or other networking hardware that needs configuring. As always when talking to Unix commands, you need to be aware of output buffering, special shell characters, and terminal input buffering as issues that can make your life difficult by munging your data or even hanging your shell connection. The Telnet protocol is natively supported by the Python Standard Library through its telnetlib module. Although Telnet is ancient, insecure, and can be difficult to script, it may often be the only protocol supported by simple devices to which you want to connect. The SSH Secure Shell protocol is the current state of the art, not only for connecting to the command line of a remote host, but for copying files and forwarding TCP/IP ports as well. Python has quite excellent SSH support thanks to the third-party paramiko package. When making an SSH connection, you need to remember three things: paramiko will need to verify (or be told explicitly to ignore) the identity of the remote machine, which is defined as the host key that it presents when the connection is made. Authentication will typically be accomplished through a password, or through the use of a public-private key pair whose public half you have put in your authorized_keys file on the remote server. Once authenticated you can start all sorts of SSH services remote shells, individual commands, and file-transfer sessions and they can all run at once without your having to open new SSH connections, thanks to the fact that they will all get their own channel within the master SSH connection.
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C H A P T E R 17
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The File Transfer Protocol (FTP) was once among the most widely used protocols on the Internet, invoked whenever a user wanted to transfer files between Internet-connected computers. Alas, the protocol has seen better days; today, a better alternative exists for every one of its major roles. There were four primary activities that it once powered. The first, and overwhelming, use of FTP was for file download. Just like people who browse the Web today, earlier generations of Internet users were able to consume far more content than they each tended to generate. Lists of anonymous FTP servers that allowed public access were circulated, and users connected to retrieve documents, the source code to new programs, and media like images or movies. (You logged into them with the username anonymous or ftp, and then out of politeness, so they would know who was using their bandwidth you typed your e-mail address as the password.) And FTP was always the protocol of choice when files needed to be moved between computer accounts, since trying to transfer large files with Telnet clients was often a dicey proposition. Second, FTP was often jury-rigged to provide for anonymous upload. Many organizations wanted outsiders to be able to submit documents or files, and their solution was to set up FTP servers that allowed files to be written into a directory whose contents could not, then, be listed back again. That way, users could not see (and hopefully could not guess!) the names of the files that other users had just submitted and get to them before the site administrators did. Third, the protocol was often in use to support the synchronization of entire trees of files between computer accounts. By using a client that provided for recursive FTP operations, users could push entire directory trees from one of their accounts to another, and server administrators could clone or install new services without having to re-build them from scratch on a new machine. When using FTP like this, users were generally not aware of how the actual protocol worked, or of the many separate commands needed to transfer so many different files: instead, they hit a button and a large batch operation would run and then complete. Fourth and finally, FTP was used for its original purpose: interactive, full-fledged file management. The early FTP clients presented a command-line prompt that felt something like a Unix shell account itself, and as we shall see the protocol borrows from shell accounts both the idea of a current working directory and of a cd command to move from one directory to another. Later clients mimicked the idea of a Mac-like interface, with folders and files drawn on the computer screen. But in either case, in the activity of filesystem browsing the full capabilities of FTP finally came into play: it supported not only the operations of listing directories and uploading and downloading files, but of creating and deleting directories, adjusting file permissions, and re-naming files.
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