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well, you don t act rationally, to say the least. There s a lot to it; it can get really emotional because you get tired and there s a lot of work and you re invested in it. All those personally motivating things think them through before you get things started. Jerry was one of my best friends before we started the company, and it s his company, so doing business with friends you always hear, Don t do business with friends, bad idea. So one of the things that really helped me was that he and I had a conversation before I joined, OK, here are the ground rules. And this is really what made me think about it. OK, if this happens, I walk away. We had the conversation in order to preserve our friendship, having no idea what was going to happen, but that conversation got me thinking about it and why was I involved.
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Livingston: Is there anything about Yahoo s early days that the world should
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know
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Brady: I know it s a bit of a clich , but the people that started it were awesome. In every aspect of the word, not just in effort or handling the responsibility they were given, but just good people, doing it for the right reasons. You could see it in the product and the way we acted.
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The early Yahoo team (1995): Donald Lobo (left),Tim Brady (second from left), Jerry Yang (seated in front), and David Filo (in his Ford Pinto)
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Mike Lazaridis
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Cofounder, Research In Motion
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Mike Lazaridis founded Research In Motion (RIM) with his friend Doug Fregin in 1984 while still an undergraduate at the University of Waterloo. One of their first projects was a local area network that ran industrial displays. Near the end of Lazaridis s senior year, they landed a $600,000 contract to build a similar network for General Motors. A few weeks shy of his graduation, Lazaridis left school to focus full-time on the company. RIM was one of the first companies to appreciate the importance of wireless networks. In the early 1990s, when email was still largely unknown in corporate America, Lazaridis foresaw the potential of mobile email. A series of projects in this area culminated in 1999 in the BlackBerry, now the dominant product in this market. The BlackBerry was one of those innovations that not only became popular, but changed the way organizations operate. Some of the most powerful people in business and politics run their lives with this device. RIM went public in 1997, and is one of Canada s most admired technology companies.
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Livingston: How did you get started with Research In Motion How did you
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know Doug
Lazaridis: I knew Doug from grade school, but we started working together in
high school. Our high school had a state-of-the-art electronics and shop program that was the result of a donation from a local industrialist. When all this equipment had arrived, it was still in crates. I had asked to open some of the boxes and pull out the equipment, and I remember the teacher saying, Well, you can open any box you like, but there s one condition: you have to read the manual first.
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This doesn t sound like a big deal, but, to a student that just came to high school to read a manual on how to use an oscilloscope, how to use a signal generator, a computer trainer, how to use all this advanced equipment these were tricky textbooks to get through and understand. Of course, once I was able to prove that I knew how to use the equipment and what it did, I was able to open the box. And we opened every single box.
Livingston: This was at a high school Lazaridis: Yeah. It was a tricky time back then because a divide between the
honor roll students and the shop students was beginning. The shop teachers tried to correct it before it got out of control and became the culture there. Many of us down in that shop program were also honor roll students. It was sort of Upstairs, Downstairs the upstairs math and computer science classrooms, and then there was the downstairs shop program. We tried to bridge the gap and explain to the teachers and students upstairs what we were learning down there and how we were applying the mathematics and science we were learning upstairs. Literally we were. I was able to give lectures to the math program, showing them how trigonometry could be applied to power generation, power control, power transformation that we were learning downstairs.
Livingston: I read that your high school electronics teachers said that connecting computers to wireless would be the next big thing. Did you realize how big it would be Lazaridis: Of course not. The thing back then is that you are juggling all these
courses and work, and at the same time you ve got these passionate interests that you just can t find enough time for. You re just trying to juggle it all, knowing that you want to get to university, so you have to get good marks. It was a bit of a challenge because you really had an extra course load. These shop programs were almost like a course to themselves, there was so much work to do. You just spent every waking hour you come to school early, you go to the shop, work a little bit further on it, then after school you go down there and hope that you can finish your homework in time to keep working on what you were doing. It was a grueling time, but it was rewarding in the sense that we had all these resources, and we basically had a brand new curriculum, so it could go as far as we were prepared to take it. Doug and I started learning about computers on our own. This was back in the late 70s. Computers were still punch card systems that were in some other building that you never got to see. But Doug and I started playing with these computer trainers they were Digital Equipment Corporation computer trainers and what we learned there was the actual fundamentals of computers: how to build gates, how to build recent memory circuits, how to build registers, and how to wire them all together and sequence them with a clock. It was very fundamental knowledge, and it really made a difference as time went on.
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