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CHAPTER
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Language-Oriented Programming
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n this chapter, you will first take a look at what I mean by language-oriented programming, a term that has been used by many people to mean different things. I ll also briefly discuss its advantages and disadvantages. You ll then look at several different approaches to languageoriented programming in F#. These techniques include using F# literals to create little languages, using F# quotations, and creating a parser using fslex.exe and fsyacc.exe, which are themselves little languages.
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What Is Language-Oriented Programming
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Although people use the term language-oriented programming to describe many different programming techniques, the techniques they refer to generally share a common theme. It s quite common for programmers to have to implement a predefined language; often this is because of a need to extract structured data from information stored or received as string or XML data that conforms to this predefined language. The techniques introduced in this chapter will help you do this more reliably. Related to this is the idea of little languages, or domain-specific languages (DSLs); you can create a DSL when the best way to solve a problem is to create a specialist language to describe the problem and then use this language to solve the problem. Functional programming has always had a strong relationship with languageoriented programming, because functional programming languages generally have features that are well suited to creating parsers and compilers.
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Language-oriented development doesn t necessarily mean you need to write your own parser or compiler, although you ll examine this possibility later in this chapter. You can accomplish a lot by creating data structures that describe what you want to do and then creating functions or modules that define how the structure should be interpreted. You can create data structures that represent a program in just about any language, but F# lends itself well to this approach. F# s literal lists and arrays are easy to define and require no bulky type annotations. Its union types allow the programmer to create structures that express related concepts yet do not necessarily contain the same types of data, something that is useful when creating languages. Finally, since functions can be treated as values, you can easily
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CHAPTER 11 I LANGUAGE-ORIENTED PROGRAMMING
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embed functions within data structures so F# expressions can become part of your language, usually as an action in response to some particular condition of the language. You ve already seen a great example of this style of programming in 7. There you looked at a module that provides a simple way to create a command-line argument processor. It is simple because it allows the user to specify a data structure, such as the one shown here, that describes what the arguments should be without really having to think about how they will be parsed: let argList = [ ("-set", Arg.Set myFlag, "Sets the value myFlag"); ("-clear", Arg.Clear myFlag, "Clears the value myFlag"); ("-str_val", Arg.String(fun x -> myString := x), "Sets the value myString"); ("-int_val", Arg.Int(fun x -> myInt := x), "Sets the value myInt"); ("-float_val", Arg.Float(fun x -> myFloat := x), "Sets the value myFloat") ] I am particularly fond of this kind of DSL because I think it makes it really clear what arguments the program is expecting and what processing should take place if that argument is received. The fact that the help text is also stored in the structure serves a double purpose; it allows the function processing command-line arguments to automatically print out a help message if anything goes wrong, and it also reminds the programmer what the argument is in case they forget. I also like this method of creating a command-line interpreter because I have written several command-line interpreters in imperative languages, and it is not a satisfying experience you end up having to write lots of code to detail how your command line should be broken up. If you are writing it in .NET, then you usually spend way too much time calling the string type s IndexOf and Substring methods.
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