birt barcode open source Figure 4-11. Contact ring: step 1 in Font

Making QR in Font Figure 4-11. Contact ring: step 1

Figure 4-11. Contact ring: step 1
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CHAPTER 4 CONTACT SENSORS
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Using 18-gauge speaker wire, loop it through the hole twice, as shown in Figure 4-12, and twist it on itself. This decreases the hole diameter a little and makes the eyelet fit tightly without any glue. After you press the eyelet into the hole, it will look like Figure 4-13.
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Figure 4-12. Contact ring: step 2
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Figure 4-13. Contact ring: step 3 Use about 7 inches (18cm) of guitar wire for the antenna. Don t cut the guitar wire with your good electronic cutters; it is very hard and will probably wreck them. Use heavy-duty diagonal cutters or pliers to cut it instead. Bend one end of the wire into the T shape shown in Figure 4-14. The base of the antenna is made from a Technic friction pin and a little aluminum foil.
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Figure 4-14. Antenna base: step 1 Feed the antenna through one of the little slots in the side of the pin (see Figure 4-15). Work the T end so that it bridges through the slot on the other side of the pin. You can now connect the other speaker wire to the antenna through the loop in the T.
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Figure 4-15. Antenna base step 2 Twist some aluminum foil into a thin roll and pack it all around the wire to center it inside the pin. This also keeps it from pulling out of the pin. Your finished antenna base should look like Figure 4-16.
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Figure 4-16. Antenna base: step 3 Combine the antenna and contact ring using the Technic right-angle beam and an axle assembled like Figure 4-17. The distance from the pin to the contact ring adjusts the sensitivity of the feeler. The closer the ring is to the pin, the less sensitive the feeler becomes. If you re making more than one, it s a good idea to reverse the direction of the right-angle beam so you end up with two symmetrical sensors.
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Figure 4-17. Finished antenna sensor
CHAPTER 4 CONTACT SENSORS
After you ve mounted the antenna sensors on the vehicle, bend the antennas so they point slightly down and outward. You ll probably need to modify the construction to make them work with other robot designs. The antennas might also need to be periodically adjusted because they get bent from use. The sensors are connected in parallel, as shown in Figure 4-18, and use only one input for the avoidance reaction. The NXT-G program is shown in Figure 4-19. The robot goes forward until one of the feelers touches something. Then the robot quickly reverses and turns about 90 degrees. After that it continues to go forward until it hits something again.
Figure 4-18. Parallel connection of two antenna sensors
Figure 4-19. Quick Start Vehicle with feeler program
Going Further
In this book we try to emphasize designs that involve all new components so that you can reproduce the projects exactly as presented. However, switches are everywhere. There are two nice ones in that discarded computer mouse over there in your junk box. Recycling switches is a practical and economical way to expand your NXT s sensor inputs.
CHAPTER 5
Resistive Sensors
Resistive sensors are an example of a NXT passive-type sensor. The term passive sensor sounds like it could be an oxymoron. After all, how could anything that senses also be passive The term is a carryover from the old RCX days when there were only two types of sensors: those that required a power supply and those that didn t. You probably figured out that passive sensors were the type that didn t. The contact sensors you learned about in 4 were also passive sensors. Connecting a resistive sensor to the NXT is just like the contact sensor. You use only two of the six sensor input connections. On the NXT plug, they re pins 1 and 2; in the cable, they re the black and white wires. It still doesn t matter which is which. In the examples that follow, we ll show you 18 gauge (0.8mm2) speaker wires, and you can presume that they re attached to these two NXT connections.
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