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In the examples in this chapter, we won t explore the solutions beyond what is necessary for discussing the EJB 3 component types but will leave some of it for you as a brainteaser. If you want to, you can peek at the entire solution by downloading the zip containing code examples file from www.manning.com/panda. In fact, we highly recommend that you follow
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New features: simplifying EJB
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the tutorial on the site to set up your development environment using the code. That way, you can follow along with us and even tinker with the code on your own including running it inside a container.
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EJB 3 is a fundamental paradigm shift from previous versions. A number of innovations, some familiar and some unfamiliar, make this paradigm shift possible. A good place to start this chapter is with an exploration of three of the most important innovations.
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2.1 New features: simplifying EJB
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There are three primary sources of complexities in EJB 2: the heavyweight programming model, direct use of the Java Naming Directory Interface (JNDI), and a verbose XML deployment descriptor. Three primary techniques in EJB 3 eliminate these sources of complexity: metadata annotations, minimal deployment descriptors, and dependency injection. In the following sections, we introduce all three of these major innovations that make developing EJB 3 as quick and easy as possible. Let s begin by looking at how annotations and deployment descriptors work.
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2.1.1 Replacing deployment descriptors with annotations
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Service configuration using Java metadata annotations is easily the most important change in EJB 3. As you ll see throughout the book, annotations simplify the EJB programming model, remove the need for detailed deployment descriptors, and act as an effective delivery mechanism for dependency injection. In the next few years, it s likely that annotations will play a greater role in improving Java Standard Edition (SE) and Java Enterprise Edition (EE) usability by leaps and bounds. In case you aren t familiar with the metadata annotation facility added in Java SE 5.0, let s review it first. Java metadata annotations: a brief primer Annotations essentially allow us to attach additional information (officially called attributes) to a Java class, interface, method, or variable. The additional information conveyed by annotations can be used by a development environment like Eclipse, the Java compiler, a deployment tool, a persistence provider like Hibernate, or a runtime environment like the Java EE container. Another way to think about annotations is that they are custom Java modifiers (in addition to private, public, static, final, and so on) that can be used by anything handling Java source or byte code. This is how annotations look:
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A first taste of EJB
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import mypackage.Author; @Author("Debu Panda, Reza Rahman and Derek Lane") public class EJB3InAction implements ManningBook
The @Author symbol is the annotation. It essentially tells whoever is using the EJB3InAction Java class that the authors are Debu Panda, Reza Rahman, and Derek Lane. More interestingly, it adds this bit of extra information about the class without forcing us to implement an interface, extend a class, or add a member variable or method. Since an annotation is a special kind of interface, it must be imported from where it is defined. In our case, the @Author annotation is defined in the mypackage.Author.class file. This is all there is to making the compiler happy. The runtime environment decides how the @Author annotation should be used. For example, it could be used by the Manning website engine to display the author names for this book. Like many of the Java EE 5.0 innovations, annotations have humble beginnings. The @ character is a dead giveaway to the grandparent of annotations JavaDoc tags. The next step in the evolution of the annotation from the lumbering caveman JavaDoc tag was the XDoclet tool. If you ve done a significant amount of work with EJB 2, you are likely already familiar with XDoclet. XDoclet acted as a source code preprocessor that allowed to you to process custom JavaDoc tags and do whatever you needed to do with the tagged source code, such as generate PDF documentation, additional source code, or even EJB 2 deployment descriptors. XDoclet referred to this paradigm as attribute-oriented programming. In case you re curious, you can find out more about XDoclet at http://xdoclet.sourceforge.net/xdoclet/index.html. The sleek new annotation facility essentially makes attribute-oriented programming a core part of the Java language. Although this is entirely possible, it is probably unlikely you ll be creating your own annotations. If your inner geek just won t leave you alone, feel free to explore Jason Hunter s article, Making the Most of Java s Metadata (www.oracle.com/technology/pub/articles/hunter_meta.html). You can find out more about annotations in general at http://java.sun.com/j2se/ 1.5.0/docs/guide/language/annotations.html. Note that, just like anything else, annotations and attribute-oriented programming have a few weaknesses. Specifically, it isn t always a good idea to mix and match configuration with source code such as annotations. This means that you would have to change source code each time you made a configuration change to something like a database connection resource or deployment environment entry.
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