how to generate barcode in vb.net 2008 Part 4 Putting EJB 3 into action in Java

Create Data Matrix in Java Part 4 Putting EJB 3 into action

Part 4 Putting EJB 3 into action
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art 4 of this book provides guidelines for using EJB 3 effectively in your enterprise Java applications. 11 offers in-depth coverage of packaging EJB 3 applications and introduces deployment descriptors. 12 explores design patterns and explains how to use EJB 3 components and JPA from the web tier. In chapter 13, you ll learn best practices for building scalable applications using EJB 3.
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This chapter covers
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Class loading concepts Packaging EJB 3 components Packaging EJB 3 entities O/R mapping with XML Deployment issues and best practices
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In the previous chapters you learned how to build a business-logic tier with session and message-driven beans, and you used entities to support the persistence tier. The real success of Java EE applications lies in assembly and deployment, as this is the key to delivering on Java s promise of write once, run anywhere (WORA). If you fail to fully grasp this step, your application may not realize this level of portability. A typical application has a handful of Java classes, and maintenance can be a nightmare if you are shipping your applications from one environment to another. To simplify maintenance you can create a Java archive (JAR) file. Typically, a JAR
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Java platform roles: it s all about juggling hats
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The Java EE platform defines different roles and responsibilities relating to development, assembly, and deployment of Java EE applications. In this book we are mainly interested in the Developer, Assembler, and Deployer roles, but we introduce you to all the roles so that you can be familiar with them. The roles defined by the specifications are
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Enterprise Bean Provider Application Assembler Deployer EJB Server Provider EJB Container Provider Persistence Provider System Administrator
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The database administrator is not one of the defined Java EE roles. The database administrator may not even understand a line of Java code. However, the importance of this role cannot be overlooked, especially in large corporations where relational databases are outside the control of the application developers. Developers, Assemblers, and Deployers may need to work with the DBAs in order to successfully build and release Java EE applications. It s all about the division of labor. Many believe that the difficulties of earlier EJB practices were a result of the division of the EJB roles. In reality, the previous EJB specifications were not the real culprit the source of all the confusion is the Java EE specification. While the Java EE and EJB specifications define seven roles, the problem is that many project teams do not even have seven people how can a two- or three-person team wear that many hats
Packaging your applications
file is a file in zip format that contains classes. However, enterprise Java applications are packaged as specialized versions of JAR files EAR, WAR, and EJB -JAR modules before they can be deployed to a Java EE compliant application server. In this chapter we begin with a discussion of application packaging and deployment. The chapter also provides critical information on class loading, so that you can appreciate why the archives are packaged as they are. This is intended to provide you a better understanding of the packaging requirements for EJBs that include entities. We explain the need for deployment descriptors, and look at how to use them. Finally, we look at a persistence unit and how to perform object-relational (O/R) mapping using XML.
11.1 Packaging your applications
A typical enterprise Java application may contain several Java classes of different types, such as EJBs, servlets, JavaServer Faces (JSF) managed beans, and entity classes, as well as static files such as JSPs and HTML files. As we discussed in chapter 1, EJBs run in the EJB container whereas web applications such as servlets and JSF managed beans run in the web container. To run your application you have to make it available to the Java EE application server. This is known as deployment. Since EJB is a core part of the Java EE specification, you have to follow the Java EE standard for deployment. To understand EJB packaging, you must consider how it fits into the bigger picture of Java EE packaging and know what constitutes a complete enterprise Java application. Up to this point we have focused on using EJB components such as session beans and MDBs to build business logic and JPA entities to implement your persistence code. However, your application will not be complete without a presentation tier that accesses the business logic you built with EJBs. For example, the EJBs we built for ActionBazaar do not make sense unless we have a client application accessing them. Most likely, you ve used standard technologies such as JSP or JSF to build the web tier of your applications. These web applications, together with EJBs, constitute an enterprise application that you can deploy to an application server. To deploy and run an application, you have to package the complete application together the web module and EJBs and deploy to an application server. Usually you will group similar pieces of the application together in modules. Java EE defines a standard way of packaging these modules in JAR files, and specifies the formats for these JARs. One of the advantages of having these formats defined as part of the specification is that they are portable across application servers.
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