how to generate qr code in c# windows application BEHAVIORS IN SILVERLIGHT in Visual C#

Create QR Code ISO/IEC18004 in Visual C# BEHAVIORS IN SILVERLIGHT

BEHAVIORS IN SILVERLIGHT
QR Code JIS X 0510 Maker In C#
Using Barcode printer for VS .NET Control to generate, create Quick Response Code image in .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
QR Code ISO/IEC18004 Decoder In C#
Using Barcode decoder for VS .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
You can also set the RepeatBehavior in Blend by clicking the Storyboard in the Objects and Timeline panel and locating the property in the Properties panel.
Encode USS-128 In Visual C#
Using Barcode drawer for VS .NET Control to generate, create UCC-128 image in .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
DataMatrix Encoder In C#
Using Barcode generator for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create ECC200 image in .NET framework applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
1. On the right of the Properties panel you will see the Split View icon, shown in Figure 7-15.
Generating Code 3/9 In Visual C#.NET
Using Barcode creator for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create Code 3/9 image in .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Drawing Universal Product Code Version A In Visual C#.NET
Using Barcode printer for VS .NET Control to generate, create GS1 - 12 image in .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Click that to view both the Design and XAML views.
Code 128 Encoder In Visual C#.NET
Using Barcode maker for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create Code 128B image in .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
GS1 - 8 Generator In Visual C#
Using Barcode generator for .NET framework Control to generate, create GTIN - 8 image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Figure 7-15. Click the Split View icon.
Printing QR Code In VB.NET
Using Barcode creator for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create Denso QR Bar Code image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Read QR Code In VB.NET
Using Barcode recognizer for VS .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
2. In the XAML portion of the screen, locate the Storyboard with the Key of Storyboard1 as I
Encode ANSI/AIM Code 128 In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode generation for .NET Control to generate, create USS Code 128 image in .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Reading ECC200 In Java
Using Barcode scanner for Java Control to read, scan read, scan image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
have done in Figure 7-16.
Barcode Maker In None
Using Barcode creator for Software Control to generate, create Barcode image in Software applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Draw Barcode In VS .NET
Using Barcode creation for Reporting Service Control to generate, create Barcode image in Reporting Service applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
The name of a Storyboard is called the Key property. The Key is how Storyboard and other resources are located in code.
USS-128 Creation In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode generator for .NET framework Control to generate, create EAN / UCC - 13 image in .NET framework applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Recognizing Barcode In Java
Using Barcode reader for Java Control to read, scan read, scan image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Figure 7-16. Locate Storyboard1 in the XAML.
Paint 2D Barcode In .NET Framework
Using Barcode generation for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create Matrix 2D Barcode image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Printing 1D Barcode In .NET Framework
Using Barcode maker for ASP.NET Control to generate, create Linear 1D Barcode image in ASP.NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
3. Change the XAML from:
Recognizing Code 128 Code Set A In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode scanner for .NET framework Control to read, scan read, scan image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Draw UCC.EAN - 128 In None
Using Barcode generator for Microsoft Word Control to generate, create UCC-128 image in Word applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
<Storyboard x:Name="Storyboard1"> to: <Storyboard x:Name="Storyboard1" RepeatBehavior="Forever">
4. Now close the Split view and go back to the Design view by clicking the Design View icon, as
in Figure 7-17.
Figure 7-17. Click the Design View icon to return to the Design workspace.
5. Close the Storyboard by clicking the Close Storyboard button, as I am doing in Figure 7-18.
Then click F6 to exit the Animation workspace and return to the Design workspace.
Figure 7-18. Close the Storyboard. Now that we have created the Storyboard and given it a Repeat Behavior of Forever, we can go ahead and fire this Storyboard using the ControlStoryboardAction Behavior.
1. Click the Asset Library and locate the ControlStoryboardAction Behavior, as in Figure 719.
Figure 7-19. Locate the ControlStoryboardAction Behavior in the Asset Library.
2. Now click and drag that Behavior onto the Ellipse, as I have done in Figure 7-20.
BEHAVIORS IN SILVERLIGHT
Figure 7-20. The ChangePropertyAction Behavior is now under the LayoutRoot Grid.
3. Click the old MouseDragElementBehavior Behavior and press the Delete key to remove it.
Then move to the Properties panel to adjust the settings for the ControlStoryboardAction Behavior.
4. In the Trigger bucket leave the default EventName of MouseLeftButtonDown. 5. In the Common Properties bucket, click the Storyboard dropdown and select our Storyboard
named Storyboard1, as I am doing in Figure 7-21.
Figure 7-21. Change the Storyboard dropdown to Storyboard1. Press F5 to run the application, click the Ellipse, and notice how it starts the Storyboard (named Storyboard1) and how it keeps repeating. Pretty cool, huh In this section we changed the Background property of the LayoutRoot Grid, made an Ellipse draggable, and then started a Storyboard when you clicked the Ellipse all without writing a single line of code other than setting the RepeatBehavior, and we could have done that in Blend! I think now you can see the power of Behaviors. Let s move on and see how easy it is to create your own simple Behavior in Visual Studio and then use it in Blend.
Creating Your Own Simple Behavior
1. Open Blend 4 and click New
Project.
2. Create a new Silverlight application called SimpleBehavior, as I do in Figure 7-22.
Figure 7-22. Create a new project in Blend called SimpleBehavior.
3. In the Projects panel right-click the Solution and left-click Edit in Visual Studio, as I am doing
in Figure 7-23.
Figure 7-23. Edit the project in Visual Studio 2010. Visual Studio 2010 will open. Here is where we are going to add our Behavior. We are going to create a Behavior that will make an object change color when the mouse is down and then return to its original color when the mouse is up. Let s do that now:
BEHAVIORS IN SILVERLIGHT
1. The first thing to do is add a new class to our project that will be our Behavior class. To do that
right-click the project in Visual Studio s Solution Explorer and click Add Figure 7-24. Class, as I do in
Figure 7-24. Add a new class to the project.
2. When the Add New Item dialog appears, name the class FillBehavior and click the Add
button.
3. Now that you have the class created, you need to add a reference to the
DynamicLinkLibrary (DLL) that allows you to create Behaviors. In the Solution Explorer right-click the References folder and left-click Add Reference, as in Figure 7-25.
Figure 7-25. Add a Reference to the project.
4. Navigate to your System.Windows.Interactivity dll. Yours should also be located in
C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft SDKs\Expression\Blend\Silverlight\v4.0\Libraries\, or wherever you installed Blend on your computer. When you find it select it and click OK, as I am doing in Figure 7-26.
Download from Wow! eBook <www.wowebook.com>
Figure 7-26. Locate System.Windows.Interactivity dll.
5. Now that you have the DLL to be able to create Behaviors, you can start to turn your
FillBehavior class into a Behavior. To do that put your cursor after FillBehavior and type : TargetedTriggerAction<FrameworkElement> . Then press Control+. (period key), click Using System.Windows.Interactivity, and press the Enter key, as I do in Figure 7-27.
Figure 7-27. Tell Visual Studio to use System.Windows.Interactivity dll.
6. You will see that there is still a blue indicator under the T in TargetedTriggerAction, indicating
that there is more that Visual Studio can do for you (see Figure 7-28).
BEHAVIORS IN SILVERLIGHT
Figure 7-28. The blue indicator is informing you that Visual Studio would like to help you write some code.
7. Press Control+. (period key) again, and you will see that Visual Studio wants to implement the
abstract class for you (Figure 7-29). Press the Enter key.
Figure 7-29. Press Control+. (period) to have Visual Studio implement the abstract class for you. Now you can see that Visual Studio went ahead and created a method for you, called Invoke (see Figure 7-30).
Figure 7-30. Visual Studio implemented the abstract class for you. This is the method that needs to be overridden for a Behavior. We could use this to add our MouseLeftButtonDown and MouseLeftButtonUp. But instead we are just going to delete the default code, as I do here: protected override void Invoke(object parameter) { }
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.