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This book is accompanied by a rich and varied set of example solutions. The sample solutions were built using the production version of WSE 3.0 that was released on November 7, 2005. The code examples are chosen to illustrate complicated concepts clearly. Although Web Services Enhancements are conceptually complicated, this does not mean that they translate into complex code. In fact, the situation is quite the opposite. You will be surprised at how clear and straightforward the code examples are, plus you will find that most WSE-supported functionality can be accessed and administered via declarative policy files that do not require you to write a single line of .NET code.
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Note The sample solutions are available for download at http://www.apress.com.
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INTRODUCTION
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Visit http://www.bluestonepartners.com/soa.aspx for updates to the book and sample solutions, and for errata corrections. Check there often, because WSE is expected to undergo several revisions between now and the release of the WCF. In addition, the topic of SOA continues to evolve rapidly, and every month brings new, interesting developments. And now, once more into the breach, dear friends, once more . . .
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CHAPTER
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Introducing Service-Oriented Architecture
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ervice-oriented architecture (SOA) represents a new and evolving model for building distributed applications. Services are distributed components that provide well-defined interfaces that process and deliver XML messages. A service-based approach makes sense for building solutions that cross organizational, departmental, and corporate domain boundaries. A business with multiple systems and applications on different platforms can use SOA to build a loosely coupled integration solution that implements unified workflows.
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Overview of Service-Oriented Architecture
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The concept of services is familiar to anyone who shops online at an e-commerce web site. Once you place your order, you have to supply your credit card information, which is typically authorized and charged by an outside service vendor. Once the order has been committed, the e-commerce company coordinates with a shipping service vendor to deliver your purchase. E-commerce applications provide a perfect illustration of the need for an SOA. If the credit card billing component is offline or unresponsive, you do not want the sales order process to fail. Instead, you want the order to be collected and the billing operation to proceed at a later time. Figure 1-1 provides a conceptual workflow for an e-commerce business that uses multiple services to process orders.
Figure 1-1. Service-based workflow for an e-commerce business
CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCING SERVICE-ORIENTED ARCHITECTURE
SOA is like other distributed architectures in that it enables you to build applications that use components across separate domain boundaries. SOA uses Web services as application entry points, which are conceptually equivalent to the proxy and stub components of traditional component-based distributed systems, except that the interactions between the Web service provider and the consumer are more loosely coupled. SOA is also unique in that it incorporates those factors that are critically important to business: service reliability, message integrity, transactional integrity, and message security. In the real world, businesses cannot take a chance on services that may not successfully process a request. It is a given that disparate systems may be up or down at various times, or that systems may differ in their responsiveness due to varying loads, but none of this is an excuse for allowing service request messages to simply drop away into the void. Furthermore, there can be no ambiguity as to how a service must be called. If a system publishes its capabilities as a web-enabled service, it needs to clearly document how the service must be called. SOA addresses many of the availability and scalability issues in today s applications. Most applications implement a rigid synchronous communication model with a linear workflow that is highly susceptible to failures at any point. SOA assumes that errors can and will occur, so it implements strategies for handling them. For example, if a service fails to accept a message request the first time, the architecture is designed to retry the delivery. And if the service is entirely unavailable (which should never occur in a robust SOA), the architecture is designed to avoid possible catastrophic failures that may disrupt the entire service request. SOA improves reliability because temporary failure in one part of the workflow will not bring down the entire business process. In a broader sense, SOA represents a maturing process, that is, the growing up of Web services and integration technologies. SOA recognizes that mission-critical systems built on distributed technology must provide certain guarantees. They must ensure that service requests will be routed correctly, that they will be answered in a timely fashion, and that they will clearly publish their communication policies and interfaces. In an SOA solution, the distributed application uses service components that reside in separate domains. Service components operate inside their own trust boundary and encapsulate their own data. They are maintained and updated independently of, though loosely coupled with, the applications that use them. Figure 1-2 shows a conceptual SOA that summarizes the three main entities in a typical SOA solution: Service providers Service consumers Service directories The consumer can use the Universal Discovery, Description, and Integration (UDDI) registry to discover or reference the description of a service provider. Interestingly, in Figure 1-2, Service Provider #1 references a service provider (Service Provider #2). In this role, Service Provider #1 is equivalent to a service consumer and can reference the UDDI registry for information about Service Provider #2.
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