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Final Thoughts on Secure Conversation
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The WS-Secure Conversation specification provides a token-based, session-oriented, ondemand, secure channel for communication between a Web service and client. WS-Secure Conversation is analogous to the SSL protocol that secures communication over HTTP .
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CHAPTER 7 EXTENDED WEB SERVICES SECURITY WITH WS-SECURITY AND WS-SECURE CONVERSATION
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WSE 3.0 provides support for implementing secure conversation in the following ways: It provides a prebuilt assembly for the STS provider. It provides a UsernameTokenManager class for processing a signed request from the client to initiate the secure conversation. It provides a specialized proxy class for the client to request a security context token from a provider. It provides a dedicated global cache for storing security context tokens.
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In this chapter we discussed the concepts of direct and brokered authentication. You learned about the advantages and disadvantages as well as the main implementation options provided by WSE 3.0. We provided an overview of how brokered authentication works when you use X.509 certificates or the Kerberos protocol. The samples included in this chapter guide you through the implementation of the mutual certificates and the Kerberos security assertions. We also reviewed how to prevent replay attacks, which are a specific form of denial-ofservice attack that can be avoided by having the Web service analyze simple SOAP header settings before responding to an incoming request. Finally we reviewed how to implement secure conversation, which has been greatly simplified in WSE 3.0 to basic configuration settings that can be easily applied to existing Web services projects. In 8, we will shift the focus to SOAP messaging and the collection of support specifications that includes WS-Addressing and WS-Referral. The discussion on WSE 3.0 support for SOAP messaging will bring you back full circle to where the book began, with the discussion on the importance of messages in service-oriented applications.
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CHAPTER
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SOAP Messages: Addressing, Messaging, and Routing
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raditional Web services are built on the HTTP request/response model. This is fine for some applications, but is limiting for others. The WSE 3.0 messaging framework is designed to give you more control over the transport and processing of SOAP messages. There are three transport channel protocols that are supported by the WSE 3.0 messaging framework out of the box: HTTP TCP and an optimized mode called In-Process for Web services and clients that , , reside within the same process. In addition, WSE 3.0 provides framework support for implementing your own custom transport protocols. For example, a number of developers are experimenting with integrating SOAP with Microsoft Message Queuing (MSMQ). Note that when using non-HTTP protocols, interoperability with other platforms is contingent upon their support for non-HTTP protocols. For example, Apache Axis 1.2 does not natively provide support for the soap.tcp protocol that is currently supported by WSE 3.0. Of course, WSE 3.0 does not force you to leverage any of its messaging capabilities. You can continue to write traditional HTTP-based Web services if you prefer. But this design pattern is only suitable if you need to implement a request/response communication design, and if you want to host your service within a virtual directory. This chapter will focus on working with the WSE 3.0 implementation of the WS-Addressing specification and with messaging and routing. Together these specifications and features provide support for Several transport protocols HTTP TCP and In-Process for clients and services that , , reside on the same application domain True asynchronous communication using TCP SOAP messages that contain their own addressing headers and endpoint reference information Automatic routing and referral for SOAP messages Custom SOAP routers
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CHAPTER 8 SOAP MESSAGES: ADDRESSING, MESSAGING, AND ROUTING
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Communication Models for Web Services
Before starting a discussion on WS-Addressing and messaging, we need to step back and take the big-picture view, starting with a review of how Web services communicate with clients. Traditional Web services communicate over the HTTP protocol and use a traditional request/response communication pattern, in which a client request results in a synchronous, direct service response. Unfortunately, this model is very limiting because it does not accommodate long-running service calls that may take minutes, hours, or days to complete. A typical synchronous Web service call will time out long before the response is ever delivered. There are five generally accepted communication design patterns, or models, that govern the exchange of SOAP messages between a service and its client (or between two services): 1. Request/response (classic): The service endpoint receives a message and sends back a correlated response message immediately, or within a very timely fashion. 2. Request/response with polling: The client sends a request message to a service endpoint and immediately returns a correlation message ID to uniquely identify the request. The service takes a significant amount of time to process the request, meaning more than you would expect if you were receiving a timely response message. Knowing this, the client must periodically poll the service using the correlation ID to ask if a response is ready. The service treats this query as a standard request/response, and replies in the negative or in the affirmative (with the actual response message). So this model involves two pairs of correlated request/response messages. 3. Request/response with notification: The client sends a request message to a service, and the service takes a significant amount of time to process the request, meaning more than you would expect if you were receiving a timely response message. The service does not reply back to the client until the processing of the request is complete. The client is responsible for waiting for the response. This model describes classic asynchronous communication. 4. One-way, or notification: The service endpoint receives a request message, but does not generate a response message. This model is not widely used. 5. Solicit/response: The reverse of request/response, whereby the service endpoint sends the client a solicitation request and receives a response. This model is not widely used. Standard ASP .NET Web services, which you build by default in Visual Studio .NET, give you the illusion that they support an asynchronous communication pattern. The Web service s WSDL document contains asynchronous versions for each operation, and the autogenerated proxy class also dutifully provides asynchronous method calls. Listing 8-1 shows a comparison between synchronous and asynchronous versions of the same Web method as they appear in an autogenerated WSE 3.0 proxy class.
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