c# pdf417 Built-in WS-Security Policy Assertions in WSE 2.0 in Visual C#

Creating PDF 417 in Visual C# Built-in WS-Security Policy Assertions in WSE 2.0

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Table 7-2. Built-in WS-Security Policy Assertions in WSE 2.0
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Policy Assertion Description
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Specifies a signature format, including the security token type and the applicable hash algorithm. The Integrity assertion contains one or more SecurityToken assertions. Specifies an encryption format, including the hash algorithm, the security token type, and the SOAP elements that must be encrypted. Specifies a security token type; included within the Integrity and Confidentiality policy assertions. Specifies the time period within which messages are considered current and may be processed. Outside of this time period, messages are considered to be expired, and will not be processed.
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MessageAge
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In addition, WSE 2.0 provides built-in support for the MessagePredicate policy assertion, which allows you to define custom business validation rules using XPath expressions. The SOAP message must conform to these rules in order to pass the policy check. The term MessagePredicate sounds confusing until you consider its meaning. Namely, it has to do with predicates for a message, otherwise known as the (policy) prerequisites for a message. The MessagePredicate policy assertion operates on the SOAP envelope, and it provides a flexible way to validate one or more parts of the SOAP message. There are certain common predicates for messages. For example, a Web service could implement a policy stating that all incoming SOAP request messages must include specific addressing headers, such as To, From, Message ID, and Action. This is a fairly common prerequisite, and so it would be an unnecessary burden to have to write custom XPath expressions for this straightforward message predicate. To keep things simpler, WSE 2.0 supports alternate dialects, including one based on message parts, which simply requires you to list those message parts in the policy file that must be present within the SOAP envelope. Without these elements, a SOAP message cannot be considered in compliance with the Web service policy. If you find that the built-in policy assertions do not fit what you need, then WSE 2.0 provides support for building custom policy assertions. WSE allows you to build a custom handler class for policy assertion logic that integrates into the WSE pipeline. This topic is beyond the scope of this chapter, but please refer to the Appendix for reference articles that provide detailed information on how to build custom policy assertions. Listing 7-1 provides one example of a policy framework, in which the Web service requires that the body of an incoming SOAP request message must be digitally signed with a UsernameToken security token. The listing includes
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Use Policy Frameworks to Enforce Web Service Requirements with WS-Policy
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a MessagePredicate policy assertion that is restricted to the message body in this listing. However, it could also be used to require the message to include specific addressing headers, for example, using wsp:Header(wsa:To), wsp:Header(wsa:Action), wsp:Header(wsa:MessageID), and wsp:Header(wsa:From). Listing 7-1. A Sample Policy Framework
< xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" > <policyDocument xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/wse/2003/06/Policy"> <mappings xmlns:wse="http://schemas.microsoft.com/wse/2003/06/Policy"> <endpoint uri="http://localhost/StockTraderSecurePolicy/StockTrader.asmx"> <defaultOperation> <request policy="#Encrypt-X.509" /> <response policy="" /> <fault policy="" /> </defaultOperation> </endpoint> </mappings> <policies xmlns:wsu="http://docs.oasis-open.org/wss/2004/01/ oasis-200401-wss-wssecurity-utility-1.0.xsd" xmlns:wsp="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/ws/2002/12/policy" xmlns:wssp="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/ws/2002/12/secext" xmlns:wse="http://schemas.microsoft.com/wse/2003/06/Policy" xmlns:wsse="http://docs.oasis-open.org/wss/2004/01/ oasis-200401-wss-wssecurity-secext-1.0.xsd" xmlns:wsa="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/ws/2004/03/addressing"> <!-- This policy ensures that the message is encrypted with an x.509 Certificate --> <wsp:Policy wsu:Id="Encrypt-X.509"> <!-- The MessagePredicate indicates where to apply the policy --> <wsp:MessagePredicate wsp:Usage="wsp:Required" Dialect="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/2002/12/wsse#part"> wsp:Body() </wsp:MessagePredicate> <!--The Confidentiality assertion is used to ensure that the SOAP Body is encrypted.--> <wssp:Confidentiality wsp:Usage="wsp:Required"> <wssp:KeyInfo> <!--The SecurityToken element within the KeyInfo element describes which token type must be used for Encryption.--> <wssp:SecurityToken> <wssp:TokenType>http://docs.oasis-open.org/wss/2004/01/ oasis-200401-wss-x509-token-profile-1.0#X509v3</wssp:TokenType> </wssp:SecurityToken> </wssp:KeyInfo>
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<wssp:MessageParts Dialect="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/2002/12/wsse#part"> wsp:Body()</wssp:MessageParts> </wssp:Confidentiality> </wsp:Policy> </policies> </policyDocument>
Listing 7-1 defines a policy framework called #Encrypt-X.509 that is a default policy, meaning that it applies to the entire Web service. The <wssp:TokenType> element specifies the required security token, while the <wssp:MessageParts> element specifies that the digital signature must apply to the body of the SOAP message. (Alternatively, you could extend the applicable message parts to include header elements.) WSE 2.0 supports other built-in policy assertions outside of WS-Security Policy; however, the assertions presented in Table 7-2 are the most important ones from the standpoint of usefulness. Other policy assertions govern requirements for text encoding and language; however, most of the time you can simply rely on the default settings for these requirements. The exception is the MessagePredicate policy assertion, which enforces the required set of elements that a SOAP message must contain. Listing 7-1 includes this policy assertion, and it requires that the incoming SOAP message contain a body tag along with several WS-Addressing related elements. Clearly, this is a SOAP message that may get routed across multiple services before returning to the client. Listing 7-1 illustrates examples of namespaces associated with the WS-Policy, WS-Policy Assertions, and WS-Security Policy specifications. By default, the policy expression applies to the entire Web service, meaning that every SOAP message is validated in the same way, regardless of what Web service operation it is intended for. If you need to map the policy expression to a specific set of Web service endpoints, then you will also need to include the namespace for the WS-Policy Attachments specification. Listing 7-2 shows an example of how WS-Policy Attachments and WS-Addressing work together to associate a policy expression with a specific Web service endpoint.
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