STANDARD FUNCTION LIBRARY in Font

Create Data Matrix in Font STANDARD FUNCTION LIBRARY

CHAPTER 2 STANDARD FUNCTION LIBRARY
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the libraries to each machine when changes are made. This is viable only if you have an environment with only a few systems. If you have a heterogeneous environment, you will always have to cope with minor differences from OS to OS or even between different versions of the same OS. A standard library is a good way of dealing with those differences and keeping your scripts portable.
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Date and Time Manipulation
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n occasion, the need for date math arises, such as when you re trying to calculate a time interval between events. The calculations seem easy enough because there are precise numbers of seconds, minutes, and hours in a day. It gets tricky, though, when you consider the fact that values have to roll over when, for example, Monday turns into Tuesday or June becomes July. For instance, calculating the difference in minutes between 6:53 am and 7:04 am is easy enough: you can multiply the hours (6 and 7) by 60 for each value, add the minutes that do not make up the next full hour, then subtract to find the difference. But what if you want the difference in minutes between 11:57 pm and 1:13 am This calculation is more complex because it involves a change in day. And the complexity only increases when the date interval spans months or years.
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Date in Days
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The following script shows one way to make date and time calculations much easier. Because UNIX and Linux calculate time based on a starting point of January 1, 1970, the script measures time in seconds since that date. Although the use of seconds may seem cumbersome, the math is simple, as you ll see in the bit of code in the Days Since Epoch section of this chapter. You reduce the date and time values to numbers of seconds elapsed since the base date then manipulate these values. All of the issues that arise when spanning across calendar increments, such as days or months, simply disappear. You might use this type of calculation when determining the age of a user s password. The third field of an account entry in a system /etc/shadow file contains the day value on which the password was changed for a particular account, as counted from 1/1/1970 (the epoch). This number can be used for various purposes for example, to determine when passwords are about to expire so as to facilitate user notifications. You can find an example of this in 36 in connection with password aging. Converting all temporal quantities to elapsed time also reduces the complexity of making time comparisons. Suppose, for example, that you would like to monitor time synchronization between multiple network nodes. When you convert the time on a
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CHAPTER 3 DATE AND TIME MANIPULATION
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system to seconds elapsed since the beginning of the UNIX epoch, the calculation becomes a simple subtraction.
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Caution Yes, the Network Time Protocol (NTP) keeps system clocks in sync. However, not all systems
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run NTP implementations. Also, clocks on some aging hardware keep such poor time that even NTP can t keep them in sync. NTP implementations can generally keep system clocks synchronized, but if a particular clock drifts beyond the panic threshold, NTP will not update the clock. Additionally, even where NTP is ubiquitous, systems can fail.
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The following Days Since Epoch script calculates the number of days between two dates. The valid dates for this equation (taken from the Gregorian calendar) range from October 15, 1582 to December 31, 9999. Dates outside this range (or dates from different calendars) require a different equation. This script is a fairly longhand way of getting these values, but the benefit is that it will run on most any system using ksh or bash. The alternatives may not. The script is based on the following formula. When the program runs, it calculates and displays the number of days that have elapsed since January 1, 1970 by determining the number for 1/1/1970 and subtracting that from the number for the current date.
(Year*365)+(Year/4)-(Year/100)+(Year/400)+(Month*306001/10000)+(Day)
There are a couple of caveats to using this formula to account for dates that land on a number line. In that case, before you perform the calculation, the values of Month and Year may need to be altered: for the months of January (1) and February (2), you must add 13 to Month and subtract 1 from Year; for all other months you simply add 1 to Month to return the correct value. The Day value to be used is always the day of the month. Thus, the equation applied to January 1, 1970, is as follows:
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