s DISTRIBUTED ARCHITECTURE in VB.NET

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CHAPTER 1 s DISTRIBUTED ARCHITECTURE
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or procedures that can be called as needed. Like the Data Access layer, it s important to recognize that the designs for data storage and management are typically very procedural. Table 1-1 summarizes the five layers and their roles. Table 1-1. The Five Logical Layers and the Roles They Provide
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Layer
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Presentation UI
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Roles
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Renders display and collects user input. Acts as an intermediary between the user and the business logic, taking user input and providing it to the business logic, then returning results to the user. Provides all business rules, validation, manipulation, processing, and security for the application. Acts as an intermediary between the business logic and data management. Also encapsulates and contains all knowledge of data access technologies (such as ADO.NET), databases, and data structures. Physically creates, retrieves, updates, and deletes data in a persistent data store.
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Business Logic Data Access
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Data Storage and Management
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Everything I ve talked about to this point is part of a logical architecture. Now it s time to move on and see how it can be applied in various physical configurations.
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Applying the Logical Architecture
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Given this 5-layer logical architecture, it should be possible to configure it into one, two, three, four, or five physical tiers in order to gain performance, scalability, security, or fault tolerance to various degrees, and in various combinations.
s Note
In this discussion, it is assumed that there is total flexibility to configure which logical layer runs where. In some cases, there are technical issues that prevent the physical separation of some layers. Fortunately, there are fewer such issues with the .NET Framework than there were with COM-based technologies.
There are a few physical configurations that I want to discuss in order to illustrate how the logical model works. These are common and important setups that are encountered on a day-to-day basis.
Optimal Performance Smart Client
When so much focus is placed on distributed systems, it s easy to forget the value of a single-tier solution. Point of sale, sales force automation, and many other types of application often run in stand-alone environments. However, the benefits of the logical n-layer architecture are still desirable in terms of maintainability and code reuse. It probably goes without saying that everything can be installed on a single client workstation. An optimal performance smart client is usually implemented using Windows Forms for the presentation and UI, with the business logic and data access code running in the same process and talking to an Access (JET) or Microsoft SQL Server Express database. The fact that the system is deployed on a single physical tier doesn t compromise the logical architecture and separation, as shown in Figure 1-2.
CHAPTER 1 s DISTRIBUTED ARCHITECTURE
Figure 1-2. The five logical layers running on a single machine
I think it s very important to remember that n-layer systems can run on a single machine in order to support the wide range of applications that require stand-alone machines. It s also worth pointing out that this is basically the same as 2-tier, fat-client physical architecture; the only difference in that case is that the Data Storage and Management tier would be running on a central database server, such as SQL Server or Oracle, as shown in Figure 1-3.
Figure 1-3. The five logical layers with a separate database server
Other than the location of the data storage, this is identical to the single-tier configuration, and typically the switch from single-tier to 2-tier revolves around little more than changing the database configuration string for ADO.NET.
High-Scalability Smart Client
Single-tier configurations are good for stand-alone environments, but they don t scale well. To support multiple users, it is common to use 2-tier configurations. I ve seen 2-tier configurations support more than 350 concurrent users against SQL Server with very acceptable performance. Going further, it is possible to trade performance to gain scalability by moving the Data Access layer to a separate machine. Single or 2-tier configurations give the best performance, but they don t scale as well as a 3-tier configuration would. A good rule of thumb is that if you have more than 50 to 100 concurrent users, you can benefit by making use of a separate server to handle the Data Access layer. Another reason for moving the Data Access layer to an application server is security. Since the Data Access layer contains the code that directly interacts with the database, the machine on which it runs must have credentials to access the database server. Rather than having those credentials on the client workstation, they can be moved to an application server. This way, the user s computer won t have the credentials to interact directly with the database server, thus increasing security. It is also possible to put the Business Logic layer on the application server. This is very useful for non-interactive processes such as batch updates or data-intensive business algorithms. Yet, at the same time, most applications allow for user interaction, and so there is a very definite need to have the Business Logic layer running on the client workstation to provide high levels of interactivity for the user.
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