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With regard to configuration, if unit tests are to be carried out on one of the integrated databases, then the configuration file for the unit tests needs to be changed, or just made available prior to the tests being run. Fortunately, there is an attribute on the <nunit2> task that allows us to include an application configuration file. This can easily be parameterized to ensure that the correct configuration file is used by the automated build process: <nunit2> <formatter type="Xml" usefile="true" extension=".xml" outputdir="${core.reports}\" /> <test appconfig="myconfig.config"> <assemblies basedir="${core.output}\"> <include name="*Tests.dll"/> </assemblies> </test> </nunit2> Therefore, this is a relatively straightforward configuration issue, though it does add another parameter to the build file, which could be standardized to the form <solution.name>. Tests.Config or something similar. In the next section, we address some additional configuration concerns.
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Both of the deployment issues we examine here may seem relatively minor at first glance, but they can cause a headache if not handled effectively. Let us consider three deployment scenarios; they may be applicable in any combination:
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CHAPTER 8 DATABASE INTEGRATION
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Automatic deploy following build. When the build is complete, we could deploy the latest version automatically. Perhaps the latest version would point at the integration database instance. In this scenario, the integration version is just for show and serves no purpose in the delivery pipeline (e.g., quality assurance, or QA). On the other hand, the system test database might be used for deployment, so that part of the QA pipeline is automated too. The problem here is that the build action under the CI process can occur at any time, which might not be ideal if system testing is already taking place. Deploy new instance. If the deployment process is separate from the CI process, this is the first of two possibilities. In this scenario, we deploy a clean build of a specific version of the system. This is the simpler of the two scenarios. Integrate existing instance. In this deployment scenario, we deploy against an existing version of the system. This is no problem in terms of code we simply replace all code assets though in fact we may have to consider the management of noncode assets (e.g., uploads from users) during deployment. For the database, that means applying the incremental migration scripts. We will build scripts allowing both the deployment of a new system/database instance, and the integration of an existing instance.
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Once the site is deployed, we need to ensure that the application points to the correct database instance. This configuration issue is actually a subset of the overall configuration issues for deployment. It can be easily handled when we do not have many configuration settings to change, but the process can become unwieldy when many changes are involved. Possible strategies include the following: <xmlpoke>. Because configuration files are XML-based, the <xmlpoke> task can be used to change values, add keys, and so on. On a small scale, this is a very useful task, but making several changes to files can become unwieldy and a maintenance headache. Configuration file linking. General configuration settings for a system can be held in companion config files and referred to from the main config file. For example, web.config might refer to settings held in dev.config, test.config, and so on. Using a single <xmlpoke> and a few cleanup tasks could handle a bulk configuration change. The benefit of this scenario is that the data for change is held outside the actual process. Configuration service. Similarly, using the Microsoft Configuration Management Block (or some other configuration service, perhaps Nini, which you can find at http://nini. sourceforge.net/) typically means that the configuration change can be handled in the same minimal way. The benefit is the same, and in addition all configuration data across all applications is maintained in one location. We will use the simplest scenario, the <xmlpoke> task, to handle the configuration changes we need. In fact, with the use of the other two scenarios, the impact to the delivery scripts is minimal: there will still need to be some kind of <xmlpoke> to point the configuration file to the appropriate companion or service.
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