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If the results are not significant, then enthusiasm from others to solve the problems and invest the time in cracking the problem can be limited. Unfortunately, as the more significant action items to achieve automation begin to appear you will rely on others to assist or mandate the required actions. For this reason, we are going to describe our automation efforts under an umbrella initiative. We will describe the initiative in pattern-like terms to achieve a common vocabulary and common understanding of the automation efforts. With this as a basis, everyone affected will at least have heard of the initiative and everyone has the opportunity to understand the mechanics and consequences.
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Design to Deliver
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My description of the automation effort is Design to Deliver. It is catchy (perhaps) and also defines the underlying theme of standardization and consideration that form some of the core pillars of success for the automation effort. We are defining a process pattern to mitigate the risks and address the problems highlighted in our earlier discussions. The pattern does not describe the nitty-gritty mechanics of achieving better quality of delivery at this point; in the general manner of patterns, the implementation may vary depending on the circumstances. However, we now have a common vocabulary for the work we are attempting, and a focus for what represents success in this work.
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Improving the delivery of a software system by ensuring successful build and deployment features is a focus from the beginning of the coding phase, as is automating these features throughout the system life cycle.
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For any successful development team involved in medium-sized projects of several months development, the number of systems to manage will eventually become cumbersome. Failing to address delivery as a specific, controlled activity leads to a degradation in the delivery processes (whatever form they take) and also increases the risk of failure for a system at a crucial point in its implementation. Through the implementation of a framework for delivery and the automation of that framework, enabling a confident repeatable delivery process has the potential to Improve software quality through increased value to supporting activities such as unit testing Improve customer satisfaction through increased levels of delivery success Reduce overhead in administration of delivery
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CHAPTER 1 A CONTEXT FOR DELIVERY
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The broad mechanics for the implementation of Design to Deliver include the following: Decide on the desired delivery process for build and deployment. Many things can be covered as part of an automated delivery solution. Listing the initial priorities provides focus for the first attempt. At this point, the automation does not necessarily have to produce a richly developed process. Aiming too high initially does not aid the exploration activities. Identify the tools to achieve the processes. There are a variety of possibilities for the automation itself and also the technologies used to complete aspects of the automated process. Providing a list of initial tools ensures that, in a world of limitless possibility, a constrained approach is followed to ensure the continued focus and simplicity of the delivery process. Identify an initial candidate for automation. An ideal candidate is a system that is standalone and that does not have too many areas of complexity, such as a database. A good candidate could be a console utility or a shared assembly. Prototype the process with the candidate. The candidate should then be automated following the steps defined in the initial process. At this point, as more required steps are found, they can be added to the overall process or held over for verification. Identify more candidates for automation. Following a successful implementation, more candidates can be identified for inclusion in the process. Once more, it is useful to group similar systems to better achieve automation. Utilize and refactor the initial automation to provide standard scripts. The new candidates should reuse the scripts from the first prototype, but the emphasis should be on refactoring, the reduction of duplicated effort, and the identification of complexity where each project has specific needs not present in the others. Refactoring should also occur in the systems themselves to provide a standard environment and system structure to facilitate the automation; that is, not only should the scripts adapt to the system but also the system should fall into line with requirements. Publish standards for the up-front implementation of automation. Scripted solutions for problems should be maintained in a library of solutions. Where systems have been amended to facilitate the automation, these amendments and standard requirements should be published and enforced in the development team at large. All systems need to be brought into line with delivery standards. Now outside of the realm of research and development, the published standards should be introduced as part of all new systems, and at the opportunities that maintenance cycles afford. It is critical to release responsibility for implementation of standards to the development team at a finely balanced point in time as it will then slow down progress on automation as a result of the time taken to implement any new refactorings and standards across multiple systems. At this point, an assessment is needed to determine whether there is scope for a full-time role or roles to handle the ongoing maintenance of this and other CM activities. In my opinion, this role will be needed.
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