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CHAPTER 2 DISSECTING NANT
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Basic Anatomy of a Build File
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NAnt is not much use on its own. It requires an input build file. By convention, these files tend to be called <name>.build, but in fact the files are just XML files and can be called anything at all.
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A Hello World Example
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Consider the following very simple NAnt script: < xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" > <project name="HelloWorld" default="go"> <property name="message" value="Hello World!"/> <target name="go"> <echo message="${message}"/> </target> </project> Even without knowing precisely how NAnt works, you can tell what the script intends to do: print Hello World! to the console. Save this script as HelloWorld.build and then do one of two things. Either navigate to the directory in which the file is saved and type nant or use an explicit path to the file at the command prompt such as nant -f:D:\BookCode\2\HelloWorld.build If the PATH environment variable has been set correctly, then you will see something like the following output: ---------- NAnt ---------NAnt 0.85 Copyright (C) 2001-2003 Gerry Shaw http://nant.sourceforge.net Buildfile: file:///HelloWorld.build Target(s) specified: go go: [echo] Hello World! BUILD SUCCEEDED Total time: 0 seconds. Output completed (0 sec consumed) - Normal Termination Our first, clearly very trivial, NAnt build file is complete. We will be looking at some much more useful and realistic examples soon where we will also see many more complicated actions.
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CHAPTER 2 DISSECTING NANT
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In the meantime, we need to consider what makes up the build script shown here, the available structures of any NAnt script, and the NAnt executable options themselves.
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The NAnt Executable
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As we have seen, once you have installed NAnt and added the \bin directory to your PATH environment variable, you are able to play with it from the command line via nant Running this command will invoke the NAnt executable. With no arguments, NAnt has the following default behavior: Invoke a file called *.build in the current working directory. Invoke the default target in this build file. Handy enough if that is what you want, but there are a variety of other possibilities. If we run the command nant help we will see a screen similar to that in Figure 2-1.
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Figure 2-1. The NAnt executable
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Command-Line Options
NAnt accepts command-line options in the following way: nant [options] <target> <target> ... The options available are shown in Table 2-1.
CHAPTER 2 DISSECTING NANT
Table 2-1. A List of NAnt Command-Line Options
Option
defaultframework:<text> buildfile:<text> v[erbose][+|-] debug[+|-] q[uiet][+|-] find[+|-] indent:<number> D:<text> logger:<text> l[ogfile]:<filename> listener:<text> projecthelp[+|-] nologo[+|-] h[elp][+|-]
Description
Uses given framework as default (short format: k) Uses given build file (short format: f) Displays more information during build process Displays debug information during build process Displays only error or warning messages during build process Searches parent directories for build file Indicates indentation level of build output Uses value for given property Uses given type as logger Uses value as name of log output file Adds an instance of the class as a project listener Prints project help information Suppresses display of the logo banner Prints a list of these options
Probably the most important of these options are the [target] option, the f (file) option, and the D (property override) option. You will tend to find that most command-line NAnt usage will be of the following form: nant -f:mybuild.build -d:myproperty=foo domybuild This command would have the effect of running the mybuild.build build file, invoking target domybuild, and setting the value of myproperty to foo. Do not worry if you are confused about properties and targets: they are all covered in the next part of this chapter. The following is a more complete explanation of the options. For the purposes of demonstrating the effects of these options, we will be using the following build file, which is just a slightly more complex variation on the Hello World script: < xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" > <project name="CommandOptions" default="target3"> <description>A very simple build script</description> <property name="message" value="Hello World!"/> <echo message="Entering main target..."/> <echo message="Exiting main target..."/> <target name="target1" description="This is target1"> <echo message="Entering target1..."/> <echo message="Exiting target1..."/> </target>
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