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The name attribute is crucial to the target, as the target is invoked by name. Simple as that.
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The description is shown when the projecthelp switch is used at the command line, and so can be of some assistance to a user of the build file.
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Targets can be made to depend on each other by use of the depends attribute. This attribute takes a comma-delimited list of targets that are to be executed prior to the execution of the target in question. For example: <target name="go" depends="foo, bar"/> This means that target go will not execute until target foo and then target bar have been executed. Additionally, any targets that foo or bar depend on must be executed. You will be pleased to note that NAnt can figure out circular dependencies so that the following build file will not execute:
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CHAPTER 2 DISSECTING NANT
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< xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" > <project name="Circular Chaos" default="foo"> <description>Circular Chaos</description> <property name="file" value="NAnt.xsd"/> <target name="foo" depends="bar"> <echo message="Chicken..."/> </target> <target name="bar" depends="foo"> <echo message="Egg..."/> </target> </project> The output produced (_nant quiet nologo) is as follows: ---------- NAnt ---------BUILD FAILED Circular dependency: foo <- bar <- foo Output completed (0 sec consumed) - Normal Termination The depends attribute introduces one of the first main powers of the build script: the chaining of targets, and thus potentially the branching and selection of targets. It is usually better to create the dependencies in other overarching targets than in the individual targets themselves. If you hard-code the dependencies into the individual targets, then testing aspects of a build file in isolation can be difficult. For example, you might want to present a build file with multiple targets as <target name="go" depends="action1, action2, action3"/> <target name="action1"> <!--Do action 1--> </target> <target name="action2"> <!--Do action 2--> </target> <target name="action3"> <!--Do action 3--> </target>
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As we will see later, working with conditionals in NAnt can be awkward. Generally, I try to avoid the use of conditionals where possible. My take is that when I have designed a process,
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CHAPTER 2 DISSECTING NANT
I do not expect to want to bypass aspects of that process. Of course, there is always a good reason to do this in reality, so if, and its counterpart unless, can come in handy. The if attribute means that a target will execute only if a property has been set to true. Conversely, the unless attribute means that a target will execute only if a property has been set to false. Trying to set properties used by if and unless to anything other than a Boolean will result in an error. Using these features, we can effectively simulate an if-else scenario using the same property. Consider: < xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" > <project name="IfElse" default="go"> <property name="ifelse" value="true"/> <target name="go" depends="if, else"/> <target name="if" if="${ifelse}"> <echo message="Executed if..."/> </target> <target name="else" unless="${ifelse}"> <echo message="Executed else..."/> </target> </project> The execution path will ordinarily be via the if target as by default, the ifelse property is set to true, but if this is overridden on the command line (to false) then the else target will be executed. So, for example, executing the line nant -D:ifelse=true will produce the following output: ---------- NAnt ---------NAnt 0.85 Copyright (C) 2001-2004 Gerry Shaw http://nant.sourceforge.net Buildfile: file:///IfElse.build Target(s) specified: go
if: [echo] Executed if... go:
CHAPTER 2 DISSECTING NANT
BUILD SUCCEEDED Total time: 0 seconds. Output completed (0 sec consumed) - Normal Termination As you can see, targets are quite flexible. They become even more powerful when combined with properties and attributes. Once we look at some of the specific structural and conditional tasks, we will see that they gain even more flexibility. Before we delve further into that, however, we need to consider properties more fully.
Properties
In the examples used so far, we have seen various properties defined and used. We have also overridden them on the command line. They are the key to making a multipurpose script, though in fact they are simply key/value pairs described in the build file. A property is described in the following way: <property name="foo" value="bar"/> This property can now be accessed by the build script in the following way: <echo message="The value of foo is: ${foo}"/> This will output the message The value of foo is: bar Properties can be combined as follows: <property name="bar" value="${foo}bar"/> So, a similar echo for bar would output the following:
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