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The XML Documentation
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We can use NDoc to transform the XML comments made in the code into compiled HTML or other types of documentation. The Transformer.ndoc project demonstrates the settings for NDoc used by the developer. NDoc has many settings and does a great job of ensuring your code documentation looks the way you want it. You can place XML code like the following above a method, class, or other code construct:
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CHAPTER 4 A SIMPLE CASE STUDY
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/// <summary> /// Gets the XML to be used for the transformation. /// </summary> public string Xml { get { return _xml; } set { _xml = ReplaceNullString(value); } } NDoc can transform the XML that is present in the source code (across all of the source code) in the way you choose to describe in NDoc to produce the documentation. The documentation is usually output as HTML but can also be output as the regular Windows Compile HTML (CHM) files you might expect with professional applications. Opening the project file in NDoc produces output similar to that shown in Figure 4-3. Once again, it is useful to know that no significant problems were encountered with the production of this material.
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Figure 4-3. NDoc output
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CHAPTER 4 A SIMPLE CASE STUDY
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The FxCop Compliancy
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Finally, in terms of additional features that the developer has considered as part of the solution, an FxCop project is provided as well. The developer of this solution has attempted to achieve FxCop compliancy by running checks at various intervals. FxCop checks your compiled assemblies against Microsoft coding standards that is, the internal standards used by Microsoft developers rather than more general object-oriented (OO) or stylistic standards. For that reason, some of its rules can seem harsh and overly restrictive, as the tool focuses on very specific uses of the C# language. You may find it is not appropriate to your team on a dayto-day basis, but nevertheless it can identify problems with syntactic technique in your code. If we run the project using FxCop, we will see the results shown in Figure 4-4. These results are not bad when you consider that FxCop is quite a hard taskmaster.
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Figure 4-4. FxCop compliancy
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Use Cases
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Although we have a good understanding from prior discussions of the requirements for the delivery process, it is worth formalizing this discussion. Here I have chosen to write simple use cases to describe the two sections of the process. There is a direct correlation between these use cases and the original skeleton scripts we formed during our discussion of NAnt. These use cases are simple but provide a way of measuring success as we construct the build files.
CHAPTER 4 A SIMPLE CASE STUDY
We can expand on the content of the use cases later on when we have a better knowledge of the actual scenario.
Build Use Case
Use Case ID: UC1 Use Case Name: Build System Description: The user triggers a system build through an application interaction. The application requires no further interaction. The application follows a series of steps to build, test, and publish a system. Once complete, a message is displayed to the user and the built assets are available for use. Preconditions: The software is in a state that will compile. The software is available to the build application. Postconditions: The system software is compiled and available in a state that will deploy. Normal Course: 1. The user triggers the build application to perform a build. 2. The application prepares an environment for performing the build process and publishing results and outputs. 3. The application supplies versioning information applicable to the system for use during compilation, management, and publishing. (See Alternative Course 3.1.) 4. The application compiles the system software. 5. The application performs unit testing and other reports on the status of the software. 6. The application creates documentation based on the output of the software compilation. 7. The application publishes the software system assets in an identifiable package and sends a message to the user. Alternative Courses: 3.1 Where no versioning is required, then a default version number is used that does not impact the regular versioning system. Exceptions: E1. All failures. Process stops immediately and sends message to user. (See Exception E2.) E2. Unit Testing. Process produces report on failing unit tests and then stops and sends message to user.
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