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For a great practical guide to unit testing (and other types of testing), a good read is Test-Driven Development in Microsoft .NET, by James Newkirk (Microsoft Press, 2004).
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Process Standards
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e have successfully created build and deploy scripts for a simple candidate application. Additionally, we identified a few areas for improvement and made useful changes to improve the flexibility of the resulting scripts. In accordance with the Design to Deliver initiative, the next challenge is to provide scripts across multiple systems to ensure the viability of the initial work. We can also take advantage of refactoring and standardization to assist the large-scale integration of all systems under our control. At the end of this chapter we should be broadly satisfied with the delivery process that is in place for a couple of systems, and be aware of outstanding issues that remain to be addressed.
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Those bright sparks at Etomic have done it again. Following the immeasurable success of the Transformer application, someone suggested it might be a great idea to have a web version of the application. Implementing a web version is quite simple because the interface and application logic for the Transformer application are cleanly separated. Therefore, a new user interface (UI) in this case a web interface can easily be coded using the same application logic. It is not as feature-rich as the Windows version, but it utilizes the same engine assembly, so in principle, it could be. Bear in mind that permitting HTML input via the Web could be a security concern something the Etomic team may have missed! The web application looks like the screen shown in Figure 5-1.
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CHAPTER 5 PROCESS STANDARDS
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Figure 5-1. Transformer web application
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We now have two simple applications with their own interfaces, sharing a common set of application logic. The application logic is controlled through the use of unit tests. Although I have not used it in this instance, the Microsoft User Interface Application Block (available from the MSDN web site at http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp url=/library/ en-us/dnbda/html/uip.asp) is a useful framework for providing separation of interface and application logic. It would be quite straightforward to have these four projects (the two UI projects, the engine assembly and the unit tests) held under one solution, but that approach would probably not provide the desired delivery scenario. Building under one solution means that a new version of each system/UI is created each time a change is made to one or the other, or to the application engine. This may not be what the teams who are developing and maintaining the systems are looking for. For example, if a new feature is placed in the application logic, then the team handling the web UI implementation may not want to use this feature at this time. They may be happy with the existing engine or not have the time in the project schedule to consider testing. The
CHAPTER 5 PROCESS STANDARDS
point is that they should be able to decide when they want to use a new engine. Similarly, changes to one interface impact on the other since both interfaces have to be built at the same time. In this case, the implementations are separate and no real justification exists for coupling the two.
Note Perhaps one justification is that the applications are considered a suite and so coupling the activities is perceived as a good idea. Clearly contexts will differ from system to system.
Seemingly then, the best idea is to have three independent processes for delivery of the subsystems and systems. The independence is only theoretical, of course, since the interfaces ultimately rely on the engine subsystem for delivery, but we can provide more choices.
The Solutions
The solutions can be found in the Visual SourceSafe (VSS) database as follows: Etomic.Library.Transformer. This solution contains the application logic engine assembly and the corresponding unit-testing assembly. Etomic.Transformer.Win. This solution references the Etomic.Library.Transformer.Engine assembly and contains a project representing the Windows interface. Etomic.Transformer.Web. This solution references the Etomic.Library.Transformer.Engine assembly and contains a project representing the web interface. We will discuss the naming and organization of the solutions in the next section, where we will also consider other useful standards.
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