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Nonaggressive Library Management
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With this method, each assembly has its own folder that contains each named version of the assembly, as shown in Figure 5-3.
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Figure 5-3. Nonaggressive library management
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CHAPTER 5 PROCESS STANDARDS
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This allows the developer to select a specific version of an assembly that does not change. This means the impact from version upgrades is minimal, but of course it could lead to a confused situation in terms of the deployed assemblies. Without some kind of progression, over a significant period of time it may not be possible to integrate newer versions of assemblies into solutions without extensive development and regression work. For this reason, you may prefer to use the next method, which gives the process a few more teeth.
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Aggressive Library Management
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Under a more aggressive library management, each assembly has its own folder that contains three more folders, as shown in Figure 5-4.
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Figure 5-4. Aggressive library management The folders are used as follows: Latest. This folder contains the latest assembly version with the regular (rather than versioned) assembly name. Specific. This folder contains the latest named version of an assembly and the historical versions of the assembly, as in the nonaggressive approach. Deprecated. This folder contains versions that are not to be used in active developments any longer. The process for using these folders is fairly obvious: A developer should always refer to the latest version of an assembly. The latest version is replaced as required. All versions are available in the Specific folder. Any build of a system dependent on the shared assembly will pick up the latest version and use it during the build.
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In the event of a failure, a developer faces two choices: fix the problem so that the latest version can be utilized, or choose a specific version and stick with that. The advantage is that the developer must consciously choose to limit the version of an assembly used with their system and thus the balance will generally fall in favor of a fix (coders being coders). Finally, the Deprecated folder can be used to remove specific versions of assemblies that are no longer desired. Moving an assembly from Specific to Deprecated will of course result in a failed build for dependent systems and so again forces a decision to be made. The important aspect of the process is that at no time are we being especially hawkish about the upgrade policy since the decision to use an older version is always available. The point is that the issues surrounding older versions are always visible to the development team and require intervention and decision making. It can be easy to fail to manage these aspects of the development environment by simply forgetting about them rather than by actively failing at them.
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Note Where components are actually more than one assembly, then the folder structure may have to be
enhanced to handle these multiple assemblies. The principle is the same, though.
This particular organizational standard offers us several clues for the deployment of our own library component, and we will see this in operation.
Tools and Support Organization
A final useful standard is the management of the tools and supporting information used by the processes and the development team. You can be just as frustrated using tools and utilities that are supposed to aid development activities as you can by lack of success of those tools if they are not managed correctly. This particular management activity is problematic since developers are likely to adapt their environments as they see fit they are humans, after all. My preferred approach is to publish a standard that requires adherence by the developers with only occasional enforcement of the standards to prove the point that voluntary adherence is the best way! In 1, we discussed tackling this problem if you use a virtual development environment such as VMWare to control the vanilla development environment. A virtual environment offers a quick turnaround of development machine rebuilds, and provides the ability to truly declare that development environments can be destroyed and rebuilt at any time. This prevents developers from personalizing the development machines too much and actually encourages discussion about tools and versions to be maintained on the vanilla virtual environment. The integration of new team members also becomes easier since everyone is looking through the same eyes. I am only briefly mentioning the use of a virtual environment, but do not underestimate the benefits of doing so. At the same time, be sure to take into account the cost for the licenses and perhaps additional memory, as well as the overhead of managing the software and preparing the virtual sessions.
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