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We will now leave the build files alone and take a look at the deploy scripts. We discussed the processes for deployment at the beginning of the chapter, and we can indeed see that the deployment processes of the three solutions are different. We will take a brief look at each file and the most relevant aspects for deployment.
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CHAPTER 5 PROCESS STANDARDS
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Etomic.Library.Transformer.Deploy.xml
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The properties to run this file are as follows: <property name="nant.onfailure" value="fail"/> <property name="company.name" value="Etomic"/> <property name="solution.name" value="${company.name}.Library.Transformer"/> <property name="project.name.1" value="${solution.name}.Engine"/> <property name="core.directory" value="D:\BookCode\BuildArea"/> <property name="core.projectarea" value="${core.directory}\${solution.name}"/> <property name="core.publish" value="${core.projectarea}\Publish"/> <property name="core.deploy" value="D:\TempDeploy"/> <property name="core.environment" value="D:\BookCode\Assemblies"/> The first few properties are the same as those for the build file. Perhaps there will be some opportunity to join the two files so that they do not have to be maintained separately, with the additional maintenance and risk that is introduced. The next three properties are duplicates as well. After that, the final properties are specific to deployment. The first is a random folder to be used for unpackaging the application and any other bits and pieces of work before actually positioning the assets. The second property is more important it points to the actual location for the assets to be published. The next interesting steps are the getting of the assets and their unpackaging: <target name="get" description="Grab the correct assets."> <delete dir="${core.deploy}\" failonerror="false"/> <mkdir dir="${core.deploy}\${sys.version}\"/> <copy file="${core.publish}\${solution.name}-Build-${sys.version}.zip" todir="${core.deploy}\"/> <unzip zipfile="${core.deploy}\${solution.name}-Build-${sys.version}.zip" todir="${core.deploy}\"/> </target> The tasks here are simple enough to follow. Then in this instance, we need to ensure that the environment for the assembly exists through the following: <target name="createenvironments" description="Create the environments required"> <mkdir dir="${core.environment}\${solution.name}\Latest\" failonerror="false"/> <mkdir dir="${core.environment}\${solution.name}\Specific\" failonerror="false"/> <mkdir dir="${core.environment}\${solution.name}\Deprecated\" failonerror="false"/> </target> Notice this includes the initial setup of the aggressive library management discussed earlier as part of the standards.
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Finally, all that remains is to place the assemblies in the required folders with the relevant names: <target name="position" description="Place required assets"> <copy file="${core.deploy}\${project.name.1}.dll" todir="${core.environment}\${solution.name}\Latest\" overwrite="true" /> <copy file="${core.deploy}\${project.name.1}.dll" tofile="${core.environment}\${solution.name}\Specific\ ${project.name.1}_${sys.version}.dll" overwrite="true" /> </target> Again, these steps are not complicated. The important aspect of this work is the overwriting of the assembly in the Latest folder with whichever published version is being used and then the write of a named version of the assembly to the Specific folder.
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Note There is no safeguard on overwriting the Latest version with some older version of the assembly.
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Once this file is run, with something like the following line, the assembly is then deployed into the chosen locations, as can be seen in Figure 5-5 and Figure 5-6: nant -f:Etomic.Library.Transformer.Deploy.xml -D:debug=false -D:sys.version=1.0.1.0
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Figure 5-5. The Latest folder
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CHAPTER 5 PROCESS STANDARDS
Figure 5-6. The Specific folder
Etomic.Transformer.Win.Deploy.xml
The Windows deployment script is similar to the script seen in the previous chapter, with the addition of the newer properties from the enhanced script efficiencies. The key change in the properties is the deployment environment, which is as follows: <property name="core.environment" value="D:\Program Files\${solution.name}"/> Apart from that, the deployment is a straightforward XCOPY. Following deployment of the 1.0.2.0 version, the structures look as shown in Figure 5-7. Notice the differing versions of the assemblies used in the build of the overall solution.
Figure 5-7. The Windows deployment
CHAPTER 5 PROCESS STANDARDS
Etomic.Transformer.Web.Deploy.xml
The web deployment script is almost identical to the Windows deployment script. In this instance, the solution name changes (of course), and the core.environment property points to a nominated share for web applications in this case, D:\Webs. Finally, at this point there is one additional line in the createenvironments target. <mkiisdir dirpath="${core.environment}\${sys.version}\" vdirname="${solution.name}-${sys.version}"/> This is about the simplest use of <mkiisdir> there is, but it suffices in this instance. After this, the deployment becomes another XCOPY scenario. Once it is completed, we can access the web application as shown in Figure 5-8.
Figure 5-8. The web deployment
Note It may seem that I am paying a lot more attention to the build process than I did to the deployment
process. This is true at this point, since the build process is much more feature-rich. The applications at this point are trivial to deploy; they do not contain configuration information or links to databases, for example. We will need to think more about these issues in subsequent chapters.
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