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As you saw in 5, partitioned tables can have several types of indexes on them. Partitioned indexes can be local or global. In addition, they can be prefixed or nonprefixed indexes. Here s a brief summary of important partitioned indexes:
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CHAPTER 21 IMPROVING DATABASE PERFORMANCE: SQL QUERY OPTIMIZATION
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Local partitioned indexes correspond to the underlying partitions of the table. If you add a new partition to the table, you also add a new partition to the local partitioned index. Global partitioned indexes don t correspond to the partitions of the local table. Prefixed indexes are partitioned on a left prefix on the index columns. Nonprefixed indexes are indexes that aren t partitioned on the left prefix of the index columns. In general, local partitioned indexes are a good indexing strategy if the table has been indexed primarily for access reasons. If your queries include columns that aren t a part of the partitioned table s key, global prefixed indexes are a good choice. Using global prefixed indexes is a good indexing strategy if the table has been indexed primarily for access reasons. Local nonprefixed indexes are good if you re using parallel query operations.
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In 5 I showed how to use the SQL Access Advisor to get advice concerning the creation of indexes and materialized views (and materialized view logs). Use the SQL Access Advisor on a regular basis to see if you need to create any new indexes or materialized views (or materialized view logs).
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Monitoring Index Usage
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You may have several indexes on a table, but that in itself is no guarantee that they re being used in queries. If you aren t using indexes, you might as well get rid of them, as they just take up space and time to manage them. You can use the V$OBJECT_USAGE view to gather index usage information. Here s the structure of the V$OBJECT_USAGE view: SQL> DESC V$OBJECT_USAGE Name Null ------------------INDEX_NAME NOT NULL TABLE_NAME NOT NULL MONITORING USED START_MONITORING END_MONITORING SQL> Type ----------VARCHAR2(30) VARCHAR2(30) VARCHAR2(3) VARCHAR2(3) VARCHAR2(19) VARCHAR2(19)
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5 shows how to use the V$OBJECT_USAGE view to find out if a certain index is being used.
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Removing Unnecessary Indexes
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The idea of removing indexes may seem surprising in the beginning, but you aren t being asked to remove just any index on a table. By all means, keep the indexes that are being used and that are also selective. If an index is being used but it s a nonselective index, you may be better off in most cases getting rid of it, because the index will slow down the DML operations without significantly increasing performance. In addition, unnecessary indexes just waste space in your system.
Using Similar SQL Statements
As you know by now, reusing already parsed statements leads to a performance improvement, besides conserving the use of the shared pool area of the SGA. However, the catch is that the SQL statements must be identical in all respects, white space and all.
CHAPTER 21 IMPROVING DATABASE PERFORMANCE: SQL QUERY OPTIMIZATION
Reducing SQL Overhead Via Inline Functions
Inline stored functions can help improve the performance of your SQL statements. Here s a simple example to demonstrate how you can use an inline function to reduce the overhead of a SQL statement. The following code chunk shows the initial SQL statement without the inline function: SQL> SELECT r.emp_id, e.name, r.emp_type,t.type_des, COUNT(*) FROM employees e, emp_type t, emp_records r WHERE r.emp_id = e.emp_id AND r.emp_type = t.emp_type GROUP BY r. emp_id, e.name, r.emp_type, t.emp_des; You can improve the performance of the preceding statement by using an inline function call. First, you create a couple of functions, which you can call later on from within your SQL statement. The first function is called select_emp_desc, and it fetches the employee description if you provide emp_type as an input parameter. Here s how you create this function: SQL> CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION select_emp_desc (type IN) number) 2 RETURN varchar2 3 AS 4 desc varchar2(30); 5 CURSOR a1 IS 6 SELECT emp_desc FROM emp_type 7 WHERE emp_type = type; 8 BEGIN 9 OPEN a1; 10 FETCH a1 into desc; 11 CLOSE a1; 12 RETURN (NVL(desc,' ')); 13 END; Function created. SQL> Next, create another function, select_emp, that returns the full name of an employee once you pass it employee_id as a parameter: SQL> CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION select_emp (emp IN number) RETURN varchar2 2 AS 3 emp_name varchar2(30); 4 CURSOR a1 IS 5 SELECT name FROM employees 6 WHERE employee_id = emp; 7 BEGIN 8 OPEN a1; 9 FETCH a1 INTO emp_name; 10 CLOSE a1; 11 RETURN (NVL(emp_name,' ')); 12 END; Function created. SQL> Now that you have both your functions, it s a simple matter to call them from within a SQL statement, as the following code shows:
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