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After you finalize the logical model, you can get down to designing the database itself. You first review the logical data model and decide which data elements you ll need for your physical database. Next, you create a first-cut physical data model from your logical data model using a tool such as ERWin Data Modeler or Oracle Designer. In the physical database design stage, your concern is about specifying how you store the data and what methods you ll use to access the data. You can work on tuning this initial physical model for better performance later on. Remember that physical database design is based on a specific DBMS (for example, Oracle Database 11g).
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Should you always work toward normalizing all your tables to reduce redundancy and avoid data anomalies Well, theoretically yes, but in reality you don t always have to be obsessed with the normalization process. When it comes to actual practice, you ll find that larger databases can easily deal with redundancy. In fact, the normalization process can lead to inefficient query processing in very large databases, such as data warehouses, because there will be more tables that need to be joined in order to retrieve information. Also, operations such as updates take more time when you have a completely normalized table structure. Thus, you end up having to decide between potential data anomalies and performance criteria.
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C HA PTE R 2 RELATIONA L DATABA SE M ODELING A ND DATABA SE DES IGN
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The purpose of physical database design is to implement your logical design. Following are some of the key tasks in the physical design stage: Translating the logical database model to fit your specific DBMS Choosing the storage setup with an eye on maximizing efficiency Creating tables (by transforming entities into tables) and the columns for each of the tables Creating primary keys, foreign keys, and constraints (thus formalizing the relationships among the objects)
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Transforming Entities and Relationships
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In the first stage of the physical design process, you transform the entity-relationship diagrams into relational tables. You create the tables based on the different groups or types of information that you have in the database. For example, you may create a table called People to hold information about the members of an organization, a table called Payments to track membership payments, and so on. What if you want to ensure that the data in your tables is unique, which is a basic assumption in most cases How about establishing relationships among tables that hold related information You can use primary keys and foreign keys to ensure uniqueness and valid relationships in your database. You ll examine these two types of keys in detail in the following sections.
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A primary key is a column or a combination of columns that uniquely identifies each record (or row) in a table. In tables that have records for different people, it is common to use social security numbers as primary keys because it s obvious that every person has a unique social security number. If there is no appropriate column you can choose as a primary key, you can use system-generated numbers to uniquely identify your rows. A primary key must be unique and present in every row of the table to maintain the validity of the data. You must select the primary keys from among the list of candidate keys for all the tables in your database. If you are using software to model the data, it is likely that you will already have defined and created all the keys for each entity. The application team determines the best candidates for the primary keys.
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Foreign Keys
Suppose you have two tables, Employees and Departments, with the simple requirement that every employee must be a member of a department. The way to ensure this is to check that all employees have a Department column in the Employees table. Let s say the Departments table has a primary key named Department ID you need to have this primary key column in the Employees table. Remember that the Employees table will have its own primary key, such as SSN. However, the values of the Department ID column in the Employees table must all be present in the Departments table. This Department ID column in the Employees table is the primary key in the Departments table, and you refer to it as a foreign key in the Employees table. Foreign keys ensure that only valid data is entered in your tables.
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