barcode crystal reports $ grep alapati test.txt alapati in Font

Drawing ANSI/AIM Code 39 in Font $ grep alapati test.txt alapati

Example
Making Code 39 Full ASCII In None
Using Barcode printer for Font Control to generate, create Code-39 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
PDF 417 Creation In None
Using Barcode generator for Font Control to generate, create PDF 417 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
$ grep alapati test.txt alapati
USS Code 39 Maker In None
Using Barcode maker for Font Control to generate, create Code 3 of 9 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Barcode Generator In None
Using Barcode generation for Font Control to generate, create Barcode image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
history
USS Code 128 Creation In None
Using Barcode maker for Font Control to generate, create Code-128 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Make EAN / UCC - 14 In None
Using Barcode creation for Font Control to generate, create EAN / UCC - 14 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
$ history -3 4 vi trig.txt 5 grep alapati test.txt 6 date 7 history -3 [pasx] $ $ passwd Changing password for salapati Old password: New password: $ pwd $/u01/app/oracle
Barcode Encoder In None
Using Barcode creation for Font Control to generate, create Barcode image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Generate USPS POSTal Numeric Encoding Technique Barcode In None
Using Barcode creation for Font Control to generate, create USPS POSTNET Barcode image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
passwd
Encoding Code 39 In Java
Using Barcode generator for Java Control to generate, create USS Code 39 image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Decoding USS Code 39 In None
Using Barcode scanner for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
uname
Printing Code 3 Of 9 In Java
Using Barcode generation for Java Control to generate, create Code39 image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Creating 1D In C#.NET
Using Barcode maker for .NET framework Control to generate, create 1D Barcode image in .NET framework applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
$ uname -a HP-UX prod5 B.11.00 A 9000/800 190 two-user license $ $ whereis who who: /usr/bin/who /usr/share/man/man1.z/who.1 $ $ which cat /usr/bin/cat
Make PDF417 In VS .NET
Using Barcode generation for Reporting Service Control to generate, create PDF417 image in Reporting Service applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Barcode Drawer In .NET Framework
Using Barcode generation for Reporting Service Control to generate, create Barcode image in Reporting Service applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
whereis
Barcode Reader In Java
Using Barcode Control SDK for BIRT reports Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in BIRT applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Quick Response Code Scanner In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode decoder for Visual Studio .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
which
Painting Barcode In Visual C#.NET
Using Barcode creation for .NET Control to generate, create Barcode image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Painting Code-39 In Java
Using Barcode printer for Android Control to generate, create Code-39 image in Android applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
CHAPTER 3 ES SEN TIAL UN IX (AN D LINUX) FOR THE ORA CLE DBA
Recognize PDF417 In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode scanner for .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Make UPC Code In Java
Using Barcode generation for Eclipse BIRT Control to generate, create Universal Product Code version A image in BIRT applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Table 3-1. Basic UNIX Commands (Continued)
Command
Description
If you are curious about who else besides you is slogging away on the system, you can find out with the who command. This command provides you with a list of all the users currently logged into the system.
Example
$ who salapati 8 08:31 rhudson 8 09:04 lthomas 9 15:54 dcampbel 8 16:27 dfarrell 5 07:00 $ whoami oracle $ pts/0 pts/1 pts/3 pts/7 pts/16 Nov Nov Nov Nov Nov
whoami
The whoami command indicates who you are logged in as. This may seem trivial, but as a DBA, there will be times when you could be logged into the system using any one of several usernames. It s good to know who exactly you are at a given point in time, in order to prevent the execution of commands that may not be appropriate, such as deleting files or directories. The example shown here indicates that you are logged in as user Oracle, who is the owner of Oracle software running on the UNIX system.
Tip It is always worthwhile to check that you are at the right place in the file structure before you press the Enter key, to avoid running any destructive commands. The following commands will help you control your input at the command line. Under the Korn shell, to retrieve the previous command, all you have to do is press the Esc key followed by typing k. If you want an older command, continue typing k, and you ll keep going back in the command sequence. If you have typed a long sequence of commands and wish to edit it, press the Esc key followed by typing h to go back, or type l to go forward on the typed command line.
Getting Help: The man Command
There are many operating system commands, most with several options. Therefore, it s convenient to have a sort of help system embedded right within the operating system so you have the necessary information at your fingertips. UNIX and Linux systems both come with a built-in feature called the man pages, which provide copious information about all the operating system commands. You can look up any command in more detail by typing man followed by the command you want information on, as follows: $ man who This command will then display a great deal of information about the who command and all its options, as well as several examples (see Figure 3-2).
CH APT ER 3 ES SEN TI AL UN IX (A ND LINU X) F O R TH E O RA CLE D BA
Figure 3-2. Output of the man command In Linux-based systems, you can also use the nifty whatis command to find out what a certain command does. Like the man command, the whatis command is followed by the name of the command you want information about. Here s a simple example: $ whatis whereis (1) -locate the binary, source, and manual page files for a command As you can see, the whatis command offers a quicker and easier way to locate summary information about any command than the more elaborate man pages.
Changing the Prompt
Every shell has its own default prompt. The default prompt for the Korn shell is the dollar sign ($). You can easily change it to something else by changing the value of the PS1 shell variable. In the following example, I first check the value of the PS1 variable by issuing the command echo $PS1. I then use the export command to set the value of the ORACLE_SID environment variable to my database name, finance. Using the export command again, I set the value of the PS1 environment variable to be the same as the value of the environment variable ORACLE_SID ($ORACLE_SID). Now the shell prompt is changed to my database name, finance. Since I only exported the ORACLE_SID variable value but didn t place it in my environment files, the value I exported is good only for the duration of the current session. $ echo $PS1 $ $ export ORACLE_SID=finance $ export PS1=[$ORACLE_SID] [finance]
Note If you add the PS1 variable to your .cshrc file (I explain how to do this later in the Customizing Your Environment section), every time you open a new shell, it ll have your customized prompt. The ability to change the prompt is useful if you re managing many different databases via UNIX. You can amend the prompt to reflect the database you re working on at any given time. For example, when you re working in an inventory system, the prompt can display invent>. That way, you won t accidentally execute a command in the wrong database.
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.