crystal reports barcode not showing LOADIN G AN D TRANSFORMING DATA in Font

Generate Code 39 in Font LOADIN G AN D TRANSFORMING DATA

CHAPTER 13 LOADIN G AN D TRANSFORMING DATA
Encoding Code 39 In None
Using Barcode encoder for Font Control to generate, create Code39 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Drawing USS Code 128 In None
Using Barcode printer for Font Control to generate, create Code 128C image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Datafile-Related Clauses
Print USS Code 39 In None
Using Barcode drawer for Font Control to generate, create Code39 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Making EAN13 In None
Using Barcode printer for Font Control to generate, create EAN13 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
You can use several clauses to specify the locations and other characteristics of the datafile(s) from which you re going to load data using SQL*Loader. The following sections cover the important datafile-related clauses.
Barcode Generation In None
Using Barcode creation for Font Control to generate, create Barcode image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Make GTIN - 12 In None
Using Barcode creation for Font Control to generate, create UPC Symbol image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Datafile Specification
QR Maker In None
Using Barcode creation for Font Control to generate, create QR Code 2d barcode image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Draw ISSN In None
Using Barcode printer for Font Control to generate, create International Standard Serial Number image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
You specify the name and location of the input datafile by using the INFILE parameter: INFILE='/a01/app/oracle/oradata/load/consumer.dat' If you don t want to use the INFILE specification, you can include the data in the control file itself. When you include the data in the control file instead of a separate input file, you omit the file location and use the * notation, as follows: INFILE = * If you choose to have the data in the control file itself, you must use the BEGINDATA clause before your data starts: BEGINDATA Nicholas Alapati,243 New Highway,Irving,TX,75078 . . .
USS Code 39 Decoder In Visual C#.NET
Using Barcode decoder for .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Scanning Code 3/9 In VB.NET
Using Barcode recognizer for Visual Studio .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Physical and Logical Records
Universal Product Code Version A Encoder In Java
Using Barcode printer for Java Control to generate, create GS1 - 12 image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Decode UPC Symbol In None
Using Barcode recognizer for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Every physical record in the source datafile is equivalent to a logical record by default, but the control file can specify that more than one physical record be combined into a single logical record. For example, in the following input file, three physical records are also considered three logical records: Nicholas Alapati,243 New Highway,Irving,TX,75078 Shannon Wilson,1234 Elm Street,Fort Worth,TX,98765 Nina Alapati,2629 Skinner Drive,Flower Mound,TX,75028 You can transform these three physical records by using either of two parameters in the control file: the CONCATENATE clause or the CONTINUEIF clause. If your input is in the fixed format, you can specify the number of rows of data to be read for each logical record in the following way: CONCATENATE 4 This CONCATENATE clause will combine four rows of data. If each row of data has 80 characters, then the total number of characters in the new logical record that is created will be 320. Therefore, when you use the CONCATENATE clause, you should also specify a record length (RECLEN) clause along with it. In this case, the record length clause is as follows: RECLEN 320 The CONTINUEIF clause lets you combine physical records into logical records by specifying one or more characters in a specified location. Here s an example: CONTINUEIF THIS (1:4) = 'next' In this line, the CONTINUEIF clause means that if SQL*Loader finds the four letters next at the beginning of a line, it should treat the data that follows as a continuation of the previous line (the four characters and the word next are arbitrary continuation indicators can be any arbitrary characters). If you are using fixed-format data, the CONTINUEIF character may be placed in the very last column, as shown in the following example:
Read UPC A In C#
Using Barcode reader for .NET framework Control to read, scan read, scan image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Draw Code 128 Code Set A In C#
Using Barcode encoder for .NET Control to generate, create Code-128 image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
C HA PTER 13 LOA DI NG A ND T RANS FORMING DA TA
Make Code39 In None
Using Barcode generation for Office Word Control to generate, create USS Code 39 image in Microsoft Word applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Generate GS1 DataBar Limited In Java
Using Barcode encoder for Java Control to generate, create GS1 DataBar Truncated image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
CONTINUEIF LAST = '&' This line means that if SQL*Loader encounters the ampersand (&) character at the end of a line, it will treat the following line as a continuation of the preceding line.
Paint Barcode In VB.NET
Using Barcode generation for .NET Control to generate, create Barcode image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Code 39 Full ASCII Encoder In VS .NET
Using Barcode creator for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create Code 39 Extended image in .NET framework applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Note Using either CONTINUEIF or CONCATENATE will slow down SQL*Loader, so map physical and logical records one to one. You should do this because when you join more than one physical record to make a single logical record, SQL*Loader must perform additional scanning of the input data, which takes more time.
PDF417 Drawer In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode creator for .NET Control to generate, create PDF 417 image in .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Create UCC - 12 In C#.NET
Using Barcode generation for .NET Control to generate, create UPC A image in .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Record Format
You may specify a record format in one of three ways: Stream record format: This is the most common record format, which uses a record terminator to indicate the end of a record. When SQL*Loader scans the input file, it knows it has reached the end of a record when it encounters the terminator string. If no terminator string is specified, the last character defaults to a newline character or a linefeed (carriage return followed by a linefeed on Windows) character. The set of three records in the previous example uses this record format. Variable record format: In this format, you explicitly specify the length at the beginning of the each record, as shown in the following example: INFILE 'example1.dat' "var 2" 06sammyy12johnson,1234 This line contains two records: the first with six characters (sammyy) and the second with twelve characters (johnson,1234). var 2 indicates that the data records are of variable size, with record size indicators specified as a field of length 2, before every new record. Fixed record format: In this format, you specify that all records are a specific fixed size. Here s an example, which specifies that every record is 12 bytes long: INFILE 'example1.dat' "fix 12" sammyy,1234, johnso,1234 Although at first glance in this example, the record seems to include the entire line (sammyy,1234, johnso,1234), the fix 12 specification means that there are actually two 12-byte records in this line. Thus, when you use the fixed record format, you may have several loader records on each line in your source datafile.
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.