crystal reports barcode not showing Important vi Text-Manipulation Commands in Font

Encode Code 3/9 in Font Important vi Text-Manipulation Commands

Table 3-5. Important vi Text-Manipulation Commands
Drawing Code 3/9 In None
Using Barcode maker for Font Control to generate, create Code39 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
QR Code Printer In None
Using Barcode drawer for Font Control to generate, create QR Code 2d barcode image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Command
Code 39 Extended Creator In None
Using Barcode encoder for Font Control to generate, create Code 39 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Barcode Creation In None
Using Barcode creator for Font Control to generate, create Barcode image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
i a o O x dd r /text :s/old/new/g yy p P :wq :q
Print DataMatrix In None
Using Barcode maker for Font Control to generate, create Data Matrix 2d barcode image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Encode UPC-A Supplement 5 In None
Using Barcode creator for Font Control to generate, create GS1 - 12 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Description
Make Barcode In None
Using Barcode printer for Font Control to generate, create Barcode image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Generating Postnet In None
Using Barcode creator for Font Control to generate, create Delivery Point Barcode (DPBC) image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Start inserting from the current character. Start inserting from the next character. Start inserting from a new line below. Start inserting from a new line above. Delete the character where the cursor is. Delete the line where the cursor is. Replace the character where the cursor is. Search for a text string. Replace (substitute) a text string with a new string. Yank or move a line. Paste a copied line after the current cursor. Paste a copied line above the current cursor. Save and quit. Exit and discard changes.
Printing ANSI/AIM Code 39 In None
Using Barcode drawer for Microsoft Excel Control to generate, create Code 3/9 image in Excel applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Printing Code 3/9 In Visual C#.NET
Using Barcode maker for VS .NET Control to generate, create Code 39 image in .NET framework applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
CH APT ER 3 ES SEN TI AL UN IX (A ND LINU X) F O R TH E O RA CLE D BA
Drawing UCC-128 In Java
Using Barcode generation for BIRT Control to generate, create GS1 128 image in BIRT applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
GTIN - 13 Creator In None
Using Barcode encoder for Online Control to generate, create EAN-13 image in Online applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
For further information on vi navigation and text manipulation commands, you can always look up a good reference, such as A Practical Guide to the UNIX System by Mark Sobell (Addison Wesley).
Barcode Generation In .NET
Using Barcode drawer for VS .NET Control to generate, create Barcode image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Encoding Barcode In .NET Framework
Using Barcode generation for Reporting Service Control to generate, create Barcode image in Reporting Service applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Moving Around with the head and tail Commands
Scan PDF 417 In None
Using Barcode decoder for Software Control to read, scan read, scan image in Software applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
QR Code Generation In .NET
Using Barcode generation for .NET Control to generate, create Quick Response Code image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
The head and tail UNIX file commands help you get to the top or bottom of a file. By default, they will show you the first or last ten lines of the file, but you can specify a different number of lines in the output, by specifying a number next to the head or tail command. The following example shows how you can get the first five lines of a file (the /etc/group file, which shows all the groups on the UNIX server): $ head -5 /etc/group root::0:root other::1:root,hpdb bin::2:root,bin sys::3:root,uucp adm::4:root $ The tail command works in the same way, but it displays the last few lines of the file. The tail command is very useful when you are performing a task like a database software installation, because you can use it to display the progress of the installation process and see what s actually happening.
Encoding UCC-128 In None
Using Barcode generation for Online Control to generate, create GS1-128 image in Online applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Make Code 128 Code Set B In .NET
Using Barcode maker for Reporting Service Control to generate, create Code 128 Code Set A image in Reporting Service applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
OTHER EDITORS
Barcode Drawer In Java
Using Barcode printer for Eclipse BIRT Control to generate, create Barcode image in Eclipse BIRT applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Generating Data Matrix 2d Barcode In C#
Using Barcode generation for .NET framework Control to generate, create ECC200 image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
In addition to the UNIX vi editor, there are several other alternatives you can use, including pico, sed, and Emacs. Most are simple text editors that you can use in addition to the more popular vi editor. It s worth noting that Emacs works well in graphical mode when you use the X Window System, and there are also specific editors for X, such as dtpad. For useful information on the various UNIX editors such as the Emacs, pico, and the vi editors, please go to http://www.helpdesk.umd.edu/systems/wam/general/1235/. Vim (or Vi improved) is an enhanced clone, if you will, of vi, and it is one of the most popular text editors among Linux administrators. You can download Vim from http://www.vim.org/download.php. For an excellent introduction to the Vim editor and its use with SQL*Plus, see David Kalosi s article Vimming With SQL*Plus at http:// www.oracle.com/technology/pub/articles/kalosi_vim.html.
Extracting and Sorting Text
The cat and more utilities, which you ve seen earlier in the Overview of Basic UNIX Commands section, dump the entire contents of a text file onto the screen. If you want to see only certain parts of a file, however, you can use text-extraction utilities. Let s look at how you can use some of the important text-extraction tools.
Using grep to Match Patterns
I described the grep command briefly earlier in the chapter you use the grep command to find matches for certain patterns in a string, using regular expressions. (For a good introduction to regular expressions, see the tutorial at http://www.regular-expressions.info/tutorial.html.) The word grep is an acronym for global regular expression print, and it is derived from the following vi command, which prints all lines matching the regular expression re: g/re/p
CHAPTER 3 ES SEN TIAL UN IX (AN D LINUX) FOR THE ORA CLE DBA
You can think of regular expressions as the search criteria used for locating text in a file; grep is thus similar to the find command in other operating systems. grep searches through each line of the file (or files) for the first occurrence of the given string, and if it finds that string, it prints the line. For example, to output all the lines that contain the expression oracle database in the file test.txt, you use the grep command in the following way: $ grep 'oracle database' test.txt In order to output all lines in the test.txt file that don t contain the expression oracle database , you use the grep command with the -v option, as shown here: $ grep -v 'oracle database' test.txt In addition to the -v option, you can use the grep command with several other options: -c: Prints a count of matching lines for each input file -l: Prints the name of each input file -n: Supplies the line number for each line of output -i: Ignores the case of the letters in the expression In addition to grep, you can use fgrep (fixed grep) to search files. The fgrep command doesn t use regular expressions. The command performs direct string comparisons, to find matches for a fixed string, instead of a regular expression. The egrep version of grep helps deal with complex regular expressions, and is faster than the regular grep command.
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.