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You can start a job and then run it in the background, returning control to the terminal. The way to do this is to specify the & parameter after the program name, as shown in the following example (you can use the ps command to see if your process is still running, by issuing either the ps -ef or ps -aux command): $ test.ksh & [1] 27149 $ You can also put a currently running job in the background, by using the Ctrl+Z sequence. This will suspend the job and run it in the background. You can then use the command fg%jobnumber to move the job that s running in the background back to the foreground.
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Sometimes you ll need to terminate a process because it s a runaway or because you ran the wrong program. In UNIX, signals are used to communicate with processes and to handle exceptions. To bring a UNIX process to an abrupt stop, you can use the kill command to signal the shell to terminate the session before its conclusion. Needless to say, mistakes in the use of the kill command can prove disastrous.
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Note Although you can always kill an unwanted Oracle user session or a process directly from UNIX itself, you re better off always using Oracle s methods for terminating database sessions. There are a couple of reasons for this. First, you may accidentally wipe out the wrong session. Second, when you re using the Oracle shared server method, a process may have spawned several other processes, and killing the dispatcher session could end up wiping out more sessions than you had intended.
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CHAPTER 3 ES SEN TIAL UN IX (AN D LINUX) FOR THE ORA CLE DBA
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There is more than one kill signal that you can issue to terminate any particular process. The general format of the kill command is as follows: kill -[signal] PID The signal option after the kill command specifies the particular signal the kill command will send to a process, and PID is the process ID of the process to be killed. To kill a process gracefully, you send a SIGTERM signal to the process, using either the signal s name or number. Either of the following commands will kill the process with a PID of 21427: $ Kill -SIGTERM 21427 $ Kill -15 21427 If your SIGTERM signal, which is intended to terminate a process gracefully, doesn t succeed in terminating the session, you can send a signal that will force the process to die. To do this, use the kill -9 signal: $ kill -9 21427
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It isn t necessary for you to be an accomplished system administrator to manage your database, but it doesn t hurt to know as much as possible about what system administration entails. Most organizations hire UNIX system administrators to manage their systems, and as an Oracle DBA, you ll need to interact closely with those UNIX system administrators. Although the networking and other aspects of the system administrator s job may not be your cup of tea, you do need to know quite a bit about disk management, process control, and backup operations. UNIX system administrators are your best source of information and guidance regarding these issues.
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Several utilities in UNIX make copies or restore files from copies. Of these, the dd command pertains mainly to the so-called raw files. Most of the time, you ll be dealing with UNIX file systems, and you ll need to be familiar with two important archiving facilities tar and cpio to perform backups and restores. The command tar is an abbreviation for tape file archiver, and was originally designed to write to tapes. The command cpio stands for copy input and output. Other operating system specific backup and recovery techniques such as fbackup/frecover, dump/restore, and xdump/ vxrestore exist, but they are mainly of interest to UNIX administrators. You most likely will use the tar and cpio commands to perform backups. The tar command can copy and restore archives of files using a tape system or a disk drive. By default, tar output is placed on /dev/rmt/Om, which refers to a tape drive. The following tar command will copy the data01.dbf file to a tape, with the format /dev/rmt/0m. The -cvf option creates a new archive (the hyphen is optional). The c option asks tar to create a new archive file, and the v option stands for verbose, which specifies that the files be listed as they are being archived: $ tar -cvf /dev/rmt/0m /u10/oradata/data/data01.dbf
The following tar command will extract the backed-up files from the tape to the specified directory: $ tar -xvf/dev/rmt/0m /u20/oradata/data/data01.dbf
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