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RAID 4: Modified Striping with Dedicated Parity
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The stripes on RAID 4 systems are done in much larger chunks than in RAID 3 systems, which allows the system to process multiple I/O requests simultaneously. In RAID 4 systems, the individual disks can be independently accessed, unlike in RAID 3 systems, which leads to much higher performance when reading data from the disks. Writes are a different story, however, under this setup. Every time you need to perform a write operation, the parity data for the relevant disk must be updated before the new data can be written. Thus, writes are very slow, and the parity disk could become a bottleneck.
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RAID 5: Modified Striping with Interleaved Parity
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Under this disk array setup, both the data and the parity information are interleaved across the disk array. Writes under RAID 5 tend to be slower, but not as slow as under RAID 4 systems, because it can handle multiple concurrent write requests. Several vendors have improved the write performance by using special techniques, such as using nonvolatile memory for logging the writes. RAID 5 gives you virtually all the benefits of striping (high read rates), while providing the redundancy needed for reliability, which RAID 0 striping does not offer.
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RAID 0+1: Striping and Mirroring
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These RAID systems provide the benefits of striped and mirrored disks. They tend to achieve a high degree of performance because of the striping, while offering high reliability due to the fact that all disks are mirrored (duplicated). You just have to be prepared to request double the number of disks you actually need for your data, because you are mirroring all the disks.
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Choosing the Ideal Disk Configuration
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Table 3-6 outlines the basic conclusions you can draw about the various RAID systems described in the preceding sections. What s the best strategy in terms of disk configuration You, the DBA, and your system administrator should discuss your data needs, management s business objectives, the impact and cost of downtime, and available resources. The more complex the configuration, the more you need to spend on hardware, software, and training.
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CH APT ER 3 ES SEN TI AL UN IX (A ND LINU X) F O R TH E O RA CLE D BA
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Table 3-6. Benefits and Disadvantages of Different RAID Systems
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System
RAID 0 RAID 1 RAID 2
Benefits
Offers high read and write performance and is cheap Provides 100 percent redundancy
Disadvantages
Not very reliable (no redundancy). Expensive, and all writes must be duplicated. Expensive and wastes a lot of space for overhead; it is not commercially viable because of special disk requirements.
RAID 3
Provides the ability to reconstruct data when only one disk fails (if two disks fail at the same time, there will be data loss) Provides the ability to reconstruct data when only one disk fails (if two disks fail at the same time, there will be data loss) Offers high reliability and provides the ability to reconstruct data when only one disk fails (if two disks fail at the same time, there will be data loss) Offers great random access performance as well as high transfer rates
Expensive and has poor random access performance. Expensive and leads to degraded write performance as well as a potential parity bottleneck. Involves a write penalty, though it is smaller than in RAID 4 systems.
RAID 4
RAID 5
RAID 0+1
Expensive (due to the mirroring of the disks).
The choice essentially depends upon the needs of your organization. If your database needs the very highest possible performance and reliability at the same time, you may want to go first class and adopt the RAID 0+1 system. This is an expensive way to go, but several companies in critical data-processing areas, such as airline reservations systems, have adopted this as a company standard for data storage. If data protection is your primary concern, however, and you can live with a moderate throughput performance, you can go with the RAID 5 configuration and save a lot of money in the process. This is especially true if read operations constitute the bulk of the work done by your database. If you want complete redundancy and the resulting data protection, you can choose to use the RAID 1 configuration, and if you are concerned purely with performance and your data can be reproduced easily, you ll be better off just using a plain vanilla RAID 0 configuration. To make the right choice, find out the exact response-time expectations for your databases, your finances, the nature of your applications, availability requirements, performance expectations, and growth patterns.
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