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DESCRIBE Command
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The DESCRIBE command describes or lists the columns and the column specifications of a table. It also enables you to describe an Oracle package or procedure. The DESCRIBE command is immensely useful when you re performing routine DBA activities. If, for example, you aren t sure what column to select in a particular table, but you re sure what table you should be querying, the DESCRIBE command helps out by giving you all the column names. Because you can describe even the metadata (the data dictionary), it s very easy to get familiar with and use table and column information that is critical for the database. Listing 4-8 shows how the DESCRIBE command enables you to display the columns and column types for a table. Listing 4-8. Using the DESCRIBE Command SQL> DESCRIBE employees Name Null Type -------------------------------- -------- --------------------EMPLOYEE_ID NOT NULL NUMBER(6) FIRST_NAME VARCHAR2(20) LAST_NAME NOT NULL VARCHAR2(25) EMAIL NOT NULL VARCHAR2(25) PHONE_NUMBER VARCHAR2(20) HIRE_DATE NOT NULL DATE JOB_ID NOT NULL VARCHAR2(10) SALARY NUMBER(8,2) COMMISSION_PCT NUMBER(2,2) MANAGER_ID NUMBER(6) DEPARTMENT_ID NUMBER(4) SQL>
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HOST Command
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The HOST command enables you to use operating system commands from within SQL*Plus. You may, for example, want to see if a file exists in a certain directory, or you may want to use the cp or tar commands at the UNIX level and return to your SQL*Plus session to resume interacting with the Oracle database.
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Here is an example showing how to use the HOST command: SQL> HOST cp /u01/app/oracle/new.sql /tmp
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The HOST command in the preceding example will help you copy the new.sql file from the specified directory to the tmp directory. Just about any command you can use at the operating system level can be executed using the HOST command. You can replace the HOST command with ! (bang, or exclamation point) to run operating system commands from within SQL*Plus, as in the following example: SQL> ! cp /u01/app/oracle/new.sql /tmp
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If you just type the command by itself, as in HOST or !, you ll be transported to the operating system directory from which you logged into the SQL*Plus session.
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When you re done with your operating system task, just type exit on the command line, and you ll return to the SQL*Plus session you just left. Here s an example: SQL> HOST $ exit SQL>
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SPOOL Command
The SPOOL command enables you to save the output of one or more SQL statements to an operating system file in both UNIX and Windows: SQL> SQL> SQL> SQL> SET LINESIZE 180 SPOOL employee.lst SELECT emp_id, last_name, salary, manager FROM employee; SPOOL OFF;
By default, spooled text files are saved as filename.lst. Although the default behavior is to save the output in a file, you can also send the output to a printer. Spooling files is very useful when you use SQL to help write SQL scripts, and you can see examples in the Appendix of this book. You can append to, or replace, an existing spool file (replacing is the default). Here is the full syntax of the command: SPOOL { file_name[.ext] [CRE[ATE]|REP[LACE]|APP[END]]| OFF | OUT } This is what the various options stand for: FILE_NAME: Specifies the name of the spool file. The file extension is optional, and .lst is the default extension in most cases. CREATE: Creates a new file. REPLACE: Replaces the contents of an existing file and creates a new file if the file doesn t exist. This is the default behavior. APPEND: Adds the contents of the buffer to the end of a file you specify. OFF: Stops spooling. OUT: Stops spooling and sends the file to your default printer. This option is not available on some operating systems.
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The SPOOL command can be put to a lot of uses. For example, you can easily export the SPOOL command to capture the results of a SELECT statement. First, control the output format by specifying the HEADING, FEEDBACK, and LINESIZE variables. Here s an example: SQL> SPOOL /u01/app/oracle/data/employees.txt; SQL> SELECT * FROM hr.employees; SQL> SPOOL OFF; The employees.txt file captures all the data in the HR.EMPLOYEES table. You can then employ the SQL*Loader utility to load the data into a different table.
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