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When all extents of a segment fill up, Oracle automatically allocates additional extents as necessary, and these extents may not be contiguous.
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Tablespaces
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Oracle databases are logically divided into one or more tablespaces. An Oracle tablespace is a logical entity that contains the physical datafiles. Tablespaces store all the usable data of the database, and the data in the tablespaces is physically stored in one or more datafiles. Datafiles are Oracle-formatted operating system files. The tablespace is a purely logical construct and is the primary logical storage structure of an Oracle database. You usually should keep related tables together in the same tablespace, since the tablespace also acts as the logical container for logical segments such as tables. How big you make your tablespaces depends on the size of your tables and indexes and the total amount of data in the database there are no rules about the minimum or maximum size of tablespaces (the maximum size is too large to be of any practical consequence). It is quite common to have tablespaces that are 100GB in size coexisting in the same database with tablespaces as small as 1GB or even much smaller. The datafiles that contain the data for the tablespaces in a database together constitute the total amount of physical space assigned to a particular database. (The size of a tablespace is the sum of the sizes of the datafiles that contain its data, and if you add up the sizes of the tablespaces or the sizes of all the datafiles, you will get the size of the database itself.) If you re running out of space in your database because you re adding new data, you need to create more tablespaces with new datafiles, add new datafiles to existing tablespaces, or make the existing datafiles of a tablespace larger. You ll learn how to perform each of these tasks in 6. There is no hard and fast rule regarding the number of tablespaces you can have in an Oracle database. The following five tablespaces are generally the default tablespaces that all databases must have, even though it s possible to create and use a database with just the first two: System tablespace Sysaux tablespace Undo tablespace Temporary tablespace Default permanent tablespace Traditionally, Oracle DBAs have used dozens and sometimes even hundreds of tablespaces to store all their application tables and indexes, and if you really think you need a large number of tablespaces to group all related application tables and indexes together, that s okay. However, you aren t required to use a large number of tablespaces. Today, most organizations use Logical Volume Managers (which were discussed in 3) to stripe the logical volumes and the datafiles over a number of physical disks. Thus, a large tablespace could span several physical disks. Previously, it was necessary to create tablespaces on different physical disks to avoid I/O contention, but with today s disk organization structures you don t have that problem, and you can make do with fewer tablespaces if you wish. You can use just one tablespace for all your application data if you wish, since the datafiles that are part of the tablespace are going to be spread out over several disks anyway. This is also why the traditional requirement to separate tables and index data in different tablespaces isn t really valid anymore.
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CH A PT ER 5 O RAC LE D AT ABA SE 11G A RCH I TEC TURE
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WHY TABLESPACES
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Tablespaces perform a number of key functions in an Oracle database, but the concept of a tablespace is not common to all relational databases. For instance, the Microsoft SQL Server database doesn t use this concept at all. Here s a brief list of the benefits of using tablespaces: Tablespaces make it easier to allocate space quotas to various users in the database. Tablespaces enable you to perform partial backups and recoveries based on the tablespace as a unit. Because a large object like a data warehouse partitioned table can be spread over several tablespaces, you can increase performance by spanning the tablespace over several disks and controllers. You can take a tablespace offline without having to bring down the entire database. Tablespaces are an easy way to allocate database space. You can import or export specific application data by using the import and export utilities at the tablespace level.
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Tablespaces are now used mainly to separate related groups of tables and indexes. This may be important for you if you need to transport tablespaces across different databases and platforms using the Oracle Data Pump utility, or if you use different database block sizes for different tablespaces. If you don t think you ll be performing these administrative tasks using tablespaces, you can conceivably use just a couple of tablespaces to store all the data in your database.
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