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Besides the System and Sysaux tablespaces, you ll most likely also have undo and temporary tablespaces. You ll also use several other permanent tablespaces to hold your data and indexes. Here s a summary of the key types of tablespaces you re likely to encounter: Bigfile tablespaces are tablespaces with a single large datafile, whose maximum size can range from 8 to 128 terabytes, depending on the database block size. Thus, your database could conceivably be stored in just one bigfile tablespace. Smallfile tablespaces can contain multiple datafiles, but the files cannot be as large as a bigfile datafile. Smallfile tablespaces, which are the traditional tablespaces, are the default in Oracle Database 11g, and Oracle creates both System and Sysaux tablespaces as smallfile tablespaces. Temporary tablespaces contain data that persists only for the duration of a user s session. Usually Oracle uses these tablespaces for sorting and similar activities for users. Permanent tablespaces include all the tablespaces that aren t designated as temporary tablespaces. Undo tablespaces contain undo records, which Oracle uses to roll back, or undo, changes to the database. Read-only tablespaces don t allow write operations on the datafiles in the tablespace. You can convert any normal (read/write) tablespace to a read-only tablespace in order to protect data or to eliminate the need to perform backup and recovery of large datafiles that don t change.
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Before you delve deeply into the logical and physical structures that make up an Oracle database, you need to be clear about a fundamental concept the difference between an Oracle instance and an Oracle database. It is very common for people to use the terms interchangeably, but they refer to different things altogether. An Oracle database consists of files, both datafiles and Oracle system files. These files by themselves are useless unless you can interact with them somehow, and this requires the help of the operating system, which provides processing capabilities and resources, such as memory, to enable you to manipulate the data on the disk drives. When you combine the specific set of processes created by Oracle on the server with the memory allocated to it by the operating system, you get the Oracle instance. You ll often hear people remarking that the database is up, though what they really mean is that the instance is up. The database itself, in the form of the set of physical files it s composed of, is of no use if the instance is not up and running. The instance performs all the necessary work for the database. Normally, there is a one-to-one relationship between a database and an instance, unlike in Microsoft SQL Server, where each instance could support multiple databases. However, multiple computers can share access to data by setting up clusters known as Oracle Real Application Clusters (Oracle RAC). Oracle RAC consists of multiple instances running on multiple clustered computers that communicate with each other through an interconnect. The cluster setup uses Oracle Clusterware to access the database that runs on a shared disk system. By harnessing the computing power of multiple servers, Oracle RAC provides redundancy, scalability, and high availability. You can easily handle increasing data processing demands by simply adding additional nodes to access the database.
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Physical database structures refer to the actual Oracle database files at the operating system level. The Oracle database consists of the following three main types of files: Datafiles: These files store the table and index data. Control files: These files record changes to all database structures. Redo log files: These online files contain the changes made to table data. In addition to these three types of files, an Oracle database makes use of several other operating system files to manage its operations. These include initialization files (like init.ora and the server parameter file [SPFILE]), network administration files (like tnsnames.ora and listener.ora), alert log files, trace files, and the password file. In addition, you also have backup files, which you must restore in case of a media failure.
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