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CHAPTER 10 DATABASE TABLES
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We looked at cluster objects, of which Oracle has three kinds: index, hash, and sorted hash. The goals of the cluster are twofold: To give us the ability to store data from many tables together on the same database block(s). To give us the ability to force like data to be stored physically together based on some cluster key. In this fashion all of the data for department 10 (from many tables) may be stored together. These features allow us to access related data very quickly, with minimal physical I/O. We observed the main differences between index clusters and hash clusters, and discussed when each would (and would not) be appropriate. Next, we moved on to cover nested tables. We reviewed the syntax, semantics, and usage of nested tables. We saw how they are in a fact a system-generated and -maintained parent/ child pair of tables, and we discovered how Oracle physically does this for us. We looked at using different table types for nested tables, which by default use a heap-based table. We found that there will probably never be a reason not to use an IOT instead of a heap table for nested tables. Then we looked into the ins and outs of temporary tables, including how to create them, where they get their storage from, and the fact that they introduce no concurrency-related issues at runtime. We explored the differences between session-level and transaction-level temporary tables, and we discussed the appropriate method for using temporary tables in an Oracle database. This chapter finished with a look at the inner workings of object tables. As with nested tables, we discovered there is a lot going on under the covers with object tables in Oracle. We discussed how object views on top of relational tables can give us the functionality of an object table, while at the same time offering easy access to the underlying relational data.
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ndexing is a crucial aspect of your application design and development. Too many indexes and the performance of DML will suffer. Too few indexes and the performance of queries (including inserts, updates, and deletes) will suffer. Finding the right mix is critical to your application s performance. Frequently, I find that indexes are an afterthought in application development. I believe that this is the wrong approach. From the very beginning, if you understand how the data will be used, you should be able to come up with the representative set of indexes you will use in your application. Too many times the approach seems to be to throw the application out there and then see where indexes are needed. This implies you have not taken the time to understand how the data will be used and how many rows you will ultimately be dealing with. You ll be adding indexes to this system forever as the volume of data grows over time (i.e., you ll perform reactive tuning). You ll have indexes that are redundant and never used, and this wastes not only space but also computing resources. A few hours at the start spent properly considering when and how to index your data will save you many hours of tuning further down the road (note that I said doing so will, not might, save you many hours). The basic aim of this chapter is to give an overview of the indexes available for use in Oracle and discuss when and where you might use them. This chapter differs from others in this book in terms of its style and format. Indexing is a huge topic you could write an entire book on the subject in part because indexing bridges the developer and DBA roles. The developer must be aware of indexes, how indexes apply to their applications, when to use indexes (and when not to use them), and so on. The DBA is concerned with the growth of an index, the use of storage within an index, and other physical properties. We will be tackling indexes mainly from the standpoint of their practical use in applications. The first half of this chapter represents the basic knowledge I believe you need to make intelligent choices about when to index and what type of index to use. The second half of the chapter answers some of the most frequently asked questions about indexes. The various examples in this chapter require different feature releases of Oracle. When a specific example requires features found in Oracle Enterprise or Personal Edition but not Standard Edition, I ll specify that.
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