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The trace files you expect to be most commonly generated as the result of setting SQL_TRACE=TRUE, or using the extended trace facility via the 10046 event, are as follows: ops$tkyte@ORA10G> alter session set events 2 '10046 trace name context forever, level 12'; Session altered.
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Whether you use SQL_TRACE or the extended trace facility, Oracle will start generating a trace file on the database server machine in one of two locations: If you are using a dedicated server connection, the trace file will be generated in the directory specified by the USER_DUMP_DEST parameter. If you are using a shared server connection, the trace file will be generated in the directory specified by the BACKGROUND_DUMP_DEST parameter. To see where the trace files will go, you may either issue SHOW PARAMETER DUMP_DEST from SQL*Plus or query the V$PARAMETER view directly: ops$tkyte@ORA10G> select name, value 2 from v$parameter 3 where name like '%dump_dest%' 4 / NAME -----------------------------background_dump_dest user_dump_dest core_dump_dest VALUE ------------------------------/home/ora10g/admin/ora10g/bdump /home/ora10g/admin/ora10g/udump /home/ora10g/admin/ora10g/cdump
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This shows the three dump (trace) destinations. Background dump destination is used by any server process (see 5 for a comprehensive list of Oracle background processes and their functions). If you are using a shared server connection to Oracle, you are using a background process; hence the location of your trace files is defined by BACKGROUND_DUMP_DEST. If you are using a dedicated server connection, you are using a user or foreground process to interact with Oracle; hence your trace files will go in the directory specified by the USER_DUMP_DEST parameter. The CORE_DUMP_DEST parameter defines where a core file would be generated in the event of a serious Oracle internal error (such as a segmentation fault on UNIX) or if Oracle Support were to have to you generate one for additional debug information. In general, the two destinations of interest are the background and user dump destinations. As a note, unless otherwise stated, we will be using dedicated server connections in the course of this book. In the event you do not have access to the V$PARAMETER view, you may use DBMS_UTILITY to access the values of most (but not all) parameters. The following example demonstrates that all you need is the CREATE SESSION privilege in order to, at the very least, see this information: ops$tkyte@ORA10G> create user least_privs identified by least_privs; User created. ops$tkyte@ORA10G> grant create session to least_privs; Grant succeeded. ops$tkyte@ORA10G> connect least_privs/least_privs Connected. least_privs@ORA10G> declare
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3 l_dummy number; 4 begin 5 l_dummy := dbms_utility.get_parameter_value 6 ( 'background_dump_dest', l_dummy, l_string ); 7 dbms_output.put_line( 'background: ' || l_string ); 8 l_dummy := dbms_utility.get_parameter_value 9 ( 'user_dump_dest', l_dummy, l_string ); 10 dbms_output.put_line( 'user: ' || l_string ); 11 end; 12 / background: /home/ora10g/admin/ora10g/bdump user: /home/ora10g/admin/ora10g/udump PL/SQL procedure successfully completed.
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The trace file naming convention changes from time to time in Oracle, but if you have an example of a trace file name from your system, it is easy to see the template in use. For example, on my various servers, a trace file name looks as shown in Table 3-1. Table 3-1. Sample Trace File Names
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Trace File Name
ora10g_ora_24574.trc ora9ir2_ora_24628.trc ora_10583.trc ora9ir2w_ora_688.trc ora10g_ora_1256.trc
Platform
Linux Linux Linux Windows Windows
Database Version
10g Release 1 9i Release 2 9i Release 1 9i Release 2 10g Release 1
On my servers, the trace file name can be broken down as follows: The first part of the file name is the ORACLE_SID (with the exception of Oracle9i Release 1, where Oracle decided to leave that off). The next bit of the file name is just ora. The number in the trace file name is the process ID of your dedicated server, available to you from the V$PROCESS view. Therefore, in practice (assuming dedicated server mode), you need access to four views: V$PARAMETER: To locate the trace file for USER_DUMP_DEST V$PROCESS: To find the process ID V$SESSION: To correctly identify your session s information in the other views V$INSTANCE: To get the ORACLE_SID
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