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CHAPTER 5 ORACLE PROCESSES
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Let s log in using shared server and in that session query: ops$tkyte%ORA11GR2> select a.username, a.sid, a.serial#, a.server, 2 a.paddr, a.status, b.program 3 from v$session a left join v$process b 4 on (a.paddr = b.addr) 5 where a.username = 'OPS$TKYTE' 6 / USERNAME SID SERIAL# SERVER PADDR STATUS PROGRAM --------- --- ------- --------- -------- -------- ----------------------------------OPS$TKYTE 49 239 SHARED 32BC20AC ACTIVE oracle@localhost.localdomain (S000) Our shared server connection is associated with a process the PADDR is there and we can join to V$PROCESS to pick up the name of this process. In this case, we see it is a shared server, as identified by the text S000. However, if we use another SQL*Plus window to query this same bit of information, while leaving our shared server session idle, we see something like this: sys%ORA11GR2> select a.username, a.sid, a.serial#, a.server, 2 a.paddr, a.status, b.program 3 from v$session a left join v$process b 4 on (a.paddr = b.addr) 5 where a.username = 'OPS$TKYTE' 6 / USERNAME SID SERIAL# SERVER PADDR STATUS PROGRAM --------- ---- ------- --------- -------- -------- -----------------------------------OPS$TKYTE 49 239 NONE 32BC15D4 INACTIVE oracle@localhost.localdomain (D000) Notice that our PADDR is different and the name of the process we are associated with has also changed. Our idle shared server connection is now associated with a dispatcher, D000. Hence we have yet another method for observing multiple sessions pointing to a single process. A dispatcher could have hundreds, or even thousands, of sessions pointing to it. An interesting attribute of shared server connections is that the shared server process we use can change from call to call. If I were the only one using this system (as I am for these tests), running that query over and over as OPS$TKYTE would tend to produce the same PADDR of 32BC20AC over and over. However, if I were to open up more shared server connections and start to use those shared server connections in other sessions, then I might notice that the shared server I use varies. Consider this example. I ll query my current session information, showing the shared server I m using. Then in another shared server session, I ll perform a long-running operation (i.e., I ll monopolize that shared server). When I ask the database what shared server I m using again, I ll (in my current session) most likely see a different one (if the original one is off servicing the other session). In the following example, the code in bold represents a second SQL*Plus session that was connected via shared server: ops$tkyte%ORA11GR2> select a.username, a.sid, a.serial#, a.server, 2 a.paddr, a.status, b.program 3 from v$session a left join v$process b 4 on (a.paddr = b.addr) 5 where a.username = 'OPS$TKYTE' 6 /
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CHAPTER 5 ORACLE PROCESSES
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USERNAME SID SERIAL# SERVER PADDR STATUS PROGRAM --------- ---- ------- --------- -------- -------- ----------------------------------OPS$TKYTE 49 241 SHARED 32BC20AC ACTIVE oracle@localhost.localdomain (S000) scott%ORA11GR2> connect scott/tiger@orcl_ss Connected. scott%ORA11GR2> exec dbms_lock.sleep(20); PL/SQL procedure successfully completed. ops$tkyte%ORA11GR2> select a.username, a.sid, a.serial#, a.server, 2 a.paddr, a.status, b.program 3 from v$session a left join v$process b 4 on (a.paddr = b.addr) 5 where a.username = 'OPS$TKYTE' 6 / USERNAME SID SERIAL# SERVER PADDR STATUS PROGRAM --------- ---- ------- --------- -------- -------- ----------------------------------OPS$TKYTE 49 241 SHARED 32BC8D1C ACTIVE oracle@localhost.localdomain (S001)
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Note You need to use an account that has execute privileges on the DBMS_LOCK package. I granted my demo
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account SCOTT execute privileges on the DBMS_LOCK package to accomplish this: sys%ORA11GR2> grant execute
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on dbms_lock to scott;
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Notice that the first time I queried, I was using S000 as the shared server. Then, in another session, I executed a long-running statement that monopolized the shared server, which just happened to be S000 this time. The first non-busy shared server is the one that gets assigned to do the work, and in this case no one else was asking to use the S000 shared server, so the DBMS_LOCK command took it. When I queried again in the first SQL*Plus session, I got assigned to another shared server process, S001, since the S000 shared server was busy. It is interesting to note that the parse of a query (returns no rows yet) could be processed by shared server S000, the fetch of the first row by S001, the fetch of the second row by S002, and the closing of the cursor by S003. That is, an individual statement might be processed bit by bit by many shared servers. So, what we have seen in this section is that a connection a physical pathway from a client to a database instance may have zero, one, or more sessions established on it. We have seen one use case of that when using SQL*Plus s AUTOTRACE facility. Many other tools employ this ability as well. For example, Oracle Forms uses multiple sessions on a single connection to implement its debugging facilities. The n-tier proxy authentication feature of Oracle, used to provide end-to-end identification of users from the browser to the database, makes heavy use of the concept of a single connection with multiple sessions, but each session would use a potentially different user account. We have seen that sessions can use many processes over time, especially in a shared server environment. Also, if we are using connection pooling with Oracle Net, then our session might not be associated with any process at all; the client would drop the connection after an idle time and reestablish it transparently upon detecting activity. In short, there is a many-to-many relationship between connections and sessions. However, the most common case, the one most of us see day to day, is a one-to-one relationship between a dedicated server and a single session.
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