crystal reports barcode font ufl 9.0 ORACLE PROCESSES in Objective-C

Printer Data Matrix 2d barcode in Objective-C ORACLE PROCESSES

CHAPTER 5 ORACLE PROCESSES
Data Matrix Encoder In Objective-C
Using Barcode creator for iPhone Control to generate, create DataMatrix image in iPhone applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Encoding Barcode In Objective-C
Using Barcode generator for iPhone Control to generate, create Barcode image in iPhone applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Dedicated Server vs. Shared Server vs. DRCP
ECC200 Maker In Objective-C
Using Barcode printer for iPhone Control to generate, create Data Matrix image in iPhone applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Barcode Encoder In Objective-C
Using Barcode creator for iPhone Control to generate, create Barcode image in iPhone applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Before we examine the rest of the processes, let s discuss why there are three main connection modes and when one might be more appropriate than the other.
Barcode Maker In Objective-C
Using Barcode creator for iPhone Control to generate, create Barcode image in iPhone applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Printing GTIN - 12 In Objective-C
Using Barcode generation for iPhone Control to generate, create UCC - 12 image in iPhone applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
When to Use Dedicated Server
Print EAN 13 In Objective-C
Using Barcode generation for iPhone Control to generate, create EAN13 image in iPhone applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
UPC-E Supplement 5 Creator In Objective-C
Using Barcode generator for iPhone Control to generate, create UPC-E Supplement 2 image in iPhone applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
As noted previously, in dedicated server mode there is a one-to-one mapping between client connection and server process. This is by far the most common method of connection to the Oracle database for all SQL-based applications. It is the simplest to set up and provides the easiest way to establish connections. It requires little to no configuration. Since there is a one-to-one mapping, you do not have to be concerned that a long-running transaction will block other transactions. Those other transactions will simply proceed via their own dedicated processes. Therefore, it is the only mode you should consider using in a non-OLTP environment where you may have long-running transactions. Dedicated server is the recommended configuration for Oracle, and it scales rather nicely. As long as your server has sufficient hardware (CPU and RAM) to service the number of dedicated server processes your system needs, dedicated server may be used for thousands of concurrent connections. Certain operations must be done in a dedicated server mode, such as database startup and shutdown, so every database will have either both or just a dedicated server set up.
Data Matrix 2d Barcode Encoder In None
Using Barcode drawer for Font Control to generate, create ECC200 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Data Matrix ECC200 Drawer In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode printer for .NET framework Control to generate, create ECC200 image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
When to Use Shared Server
Encode GS1 - 12 In VB.NET
Using Barcode encoder for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create UPC-A image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
GS1 128 Generation In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode generator for .NET Control to generate, create USS-128 image in .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Shared server setup and configuration, while not difficult, involves an extra step beyond dedicated server setup. The main difference between the two is not, however, in their setup; it is in their mode of operation. With dedicated server, there is a one-to-one mapping between client connections and server processes. With shared server, there is a many-to-one relationship: many clients to a shared server. As its name implies, shared server is a shared resource, whereas a dedicated server is not. When using a shared resource, you must be careful to not monopolize it for long periods of time. As you saw previously, use of a simple DBMS_LOCK.SLEEP(20) in one session would monopolize a shared server process for 20 seconds. Monopolization of these shared server resources can lead to a system that appears to hang. Figure 5-2 depicts two shared servers. If I have three clients and all of them attempt to run a 45second process more or less at the same time, two of them will get their response in 45 seconds and the third will get its response in 90 seconds. This is rule number one for shared server: make sure your transactions are short in duration. They can be frequent, but they should be short (as characterized by OLTP systems). If they are not short, you will get what appears to be a total system slowdown due to shared resources being monopolized by a few processes. In extreme cases, if all of the shared servers are busy, the system will appear to hang for all users except the lucky few who are monopolizing the shared servers. Another interesting situation that you may observe when using shared server is that of an artificial deadlock. With shared server, a number of server processes are being shared by a potentially large community of users. Consider a situation where you have five shared servers and one hundred user sessions established. At most, five of those user sessions can be active at any point in time. Suppose one of these user sessions updates a row and does not commit. While that user sits there and ponders his or her modification, five other user sessions try to lock that same row. They will, of course, become blocked and will patiently wait for that row to become available. Now the user session that holds the lock on this row attempts to commit its transaction (hence releasing the lock on the row). That user session will find that all of the shared servers are being monopolized by the five waiting sessions. We have an artificial deadlock situation here: the holder of the lock will never get a shared server to permit the commit, unless one of the waiting sessions gives up its shared server. But, unless the waiting sessions are waiting for the
GS1-128 Drawer In .NET Framework
Using Barcode generator for Reporting Service Control to generate, create EAN / UCC - 14 image in Reporting Service applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Decode Barcode In C#.NET
Using Barcode Control SDK for VS .NET Control to generate, create, read, scan barcode image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Code 128A Encoder In None
Using Barcode printer for Font Control to generate, create USS Code 128 image in Font applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
ANSI/AIM Code 39 Maker In VB.NET
Using Barcode drawer for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create Code 3/9 image in .NET framework applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Make Code 39 In None
Using Barcode generator for Office Excel Control to generate, create Code39 image in Excel applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
UPC A Printer In None
Using Barcode drawer for Online Control to generate, create UPC Symbol image in Online applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Painting Code 128 Code Set C In .NET
Using Barcode creator for Reporting Service Control to generate, create Code 128 Code Set C image in Reporting Service applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
1D Printer In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode generation for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create Linear image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.