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his is one of the most important chapters of the book, even though it is not directly about JDBC. My objective here is to convince you, through examples, that there is more to writing effective Java database applications than an in-depth understanding of the JDBC API. Furthermore, I want to convey that to write correct, robust, and high-performance Oracle applications using JDBC (or any other API for that matter), you need to Understand how Oracle works. You should understand the fundamentals of Oracle s architecture and how to design your application accordingly. Learn and master SQL and PL/SQL. JDBC on Oracle works on top of SQL and PL/SQL. If your SQL and PL/SQL code is suboptimal, your application will run in a suboptimal fashion. I use these languages, where appropriate, throughout the book. Know what features Oracle offers. Unless you are familiar with the features offered by Oracle, you will end up developing, debugging, and maintaining code that is already available to you in Oracle. If you are interested in jumping directly to JDBC mechanics, you should start with the next chapter. However, I strongly recommend that you read this chapter first or at least skim through it. The reason for this is that, in my opinion, if you don t understand how Oracle works and what features it offers, more often than not you ll write incorrect and/or nonperforming code. This statement may come as a surprise to you, but by the time you ve finished this chapter, I hope to have convinced you of its validity. Of course, in a single chapter, we can only really scratch the surface of Oracle and its features, although we will cover enough so that their significance and their impact on the way in which you write your Java programs will be apparent.
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Note If you wish to learn more, I strongly urge you to get hold of the following two books: Expert
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One-on-One Oracle (Apress, ISBN: 1-59059-243-3) and Effective Oracle by Design (Osborne McGraw-Hill, ISBN: 0-07-223065-7), both written by the well-known Oracle expert Tom Kyte. Additionally, Tom s site, http://asktom.oracle.com, is a treasure trove of information on Oracle. You can ask questions on most Oracle-related topics on this site and get well-researched, correct answers unbelievably fast and for free.
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CHAPTER 2 ORACLE FUNDAMENTALS
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Let s now look at some selected Oracle concepts that you need to be aware of to build applications on top of Oracle.
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Selected Oracle Concepts
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Although it is not necessary to know the intimate details of how the Oracle kernel works, it is very useful to be familiar with certain Oracle architectural details, such as its concurrency model, how it manages data in its memory and disk, and so on.
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Two terms that are commonly used in reference to basic Oracle architecture, and that often cause confusion, are database and instance. In simple terms, A database is a collection of physical data files (operating system files) that reside on disk. An instance is a set of Oracle processes along with their shared memory area. These processes (referred to as background processes) are what actually operate on the database files, performing such tasks as storing and retrieving the data. So, a database is a collection of physical storage files, and an instance is set of processes and an area of memory that allows you to operate on those files. You do not have to do anything special in your JDBC code to account for this distinction, but it is useful to be aware of it.
Schemas
A schema is simply the collection of objects (tables, indexes, views, stored procedures, and so on) owned by a database user. A database user can own exactly one schema, though the same user may have access to multiple schemas. Included in the database are two important users/schemas: the SYS and SYSTEM users. The SYS user/schema contains, among other things, the data dictionary for the database. The data dictionary consists of various tables and views that contain all the metadata for the rest of the database, including definitions for all of the objects in a schema (as well as the database as a whole). For example, the user_tables view contains a great deal of information about each of the tables in the schema for the current user. You may need to occasionally look up information about objects in the database such as size, location, or creation date, for example, and the data dictionary is the place to do it. Accessing the information in the data dictionary is performed in the same manner as accessing any other information in the database. However, since the data dictionary is read-only, only select statements are permitted.
Note See Oracle Database Concepts Guide (10g Release 1) or the Oracle Database Reference (10g Release 1)
in the Oracle-supplied documentation for complete details on the tables and views in the data dictionary.
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