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Figure 1-13. Business logic centralized in the Business Logic layer
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The tools for addressing this seemingly intractable set of requirements are mobile business objects that encapsulate the application s data along with its related business logic. It turns out that a properly constructed business object can move around the network from machine to machine with almost no effort on your part. The .NET Framework itself handles the details, and you can focus on the business logic and data. By properly designing and implementing mobile business objects, you allow the .NET Framework to pass your objects across the network by value, thereby automatically copying them from one machine to another. This means that with little extra code, you can have your business logic and business data move to the machine where the UI tier is running, and then shift to the machine where the Data Access tier is running when data access is required. At the same time, if you re running the UI tier and Data Access tier on the same machine, then the .NET Framework doesn t move or copy your business objects. They re used directly by both tiers with no performance cost or extra overhead. You don t have to do anything to make this happen, either .NET automatically detects that the object doesn t need to be copied or moved, and thus takes no extra action. The Business Logic layer becomes portable, flexible, and mobile, and adapts to the physical environment in which you deploy the application. Due to this, you re able to support a variety of physical n-tier architectures with one code base, whereby your business objects contain no extra code to support the various possible deployment scenarios. What little code you need to implement to support the movement of your objects from machine to machine will be encapsulated in a framework, leaving the business developer to focus purely on the development of business logic.
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Business Objects
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Having decided to use business objects and take advantage of .NET s ability to move objects around the network automatically, it s now time to discuss business objects in more detail. I will discuss exactly what they are and how they can help you to centralize the business logic pertaining to your data. The primary goal when designing any kind of software object is to create an abstract representation of some entity or concept. In ADO.NET, for example, a DataTable object represents a tabular set of data. DataTables provide an abstract and consistent mechanism by which you can work with any tabular data. Likewise, a Windows Forms TextBox control is an object that represents the concept of displaying and entering data. From the application s perspective, there is no need to have any understanding of how the control is rendered on the screen, or how the user interacts with it. It s just an object that includes a Text property and a handful of interesting events. Key to successful object design is the concept of encapsulation. This means that an object is a black box: it contains logic and data, but the user of the object doesn t know what data or how the logic actually works. All they can do is interact with the object.
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Properly designed objects encapsulate both behavior or logic and the data required by that logic.
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If objects are abstract representations of entities or concepts that encapsulate both data and its related logic, what then are business objects
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Business objects are different from regular objects only in terms of what they represent.
Object-oriented applications are created to address problems of one sort or another. In the course of doing so, a variety of different objects are often used. Some of these objects will have no direct connection with the problem at hand (DataTable and TextBox objects, for example, are just abstract representations of computer concepts). However, there will be others that are closely related to the area or domain in which you re working. If the objects are related to the business for which you re developing an application, then they re business objects. For instance, if you re creating an order entry system, your business domain will include things such as customers, orders, and products. Each of these will likely become business objects within your order entry application the Order object, for example, will provide an abstract representation of the order being placed by a customer.
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