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Web Services as Services
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You can also view a web service as a service. The fact that the word service is in the name of the technology might lead you to believe that they are all services, but that s not really true. A service is an autonomous entity that performs some processing operation. You communicate with a service by sending and receiving messages. In today s world, those messages are almost always XML documents or fragments, though nothing in SOA mandates the use of XML. Of course, web services do mandate the use of XML, so when implementing service-oriented web services, the messages are always XML. That said, .NET supports web services in such a way that you ll often interact with a strongly typed proxy object, rather than ever seeing the XML yourself.
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s Note
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I argue that this is a good thing. XML was never intended for human consumption, and a good programming toolset should always provide higher-level abstractions so programmers don t have to deal with XML directly.
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Autonomy
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The first big thing to realize is that services are autonomous. Technically, this means self-governing, but in the case of a service, it means totally independent. It means that the service is a thing unto itself and is not part of some other application. It is not a tier in an n-tier model. This is entirely unlike the typical view of MTS/COM+ components, which are almost always viewed as being a tier in an n-tier or client/server application. Instead, a service is an application. Other applications (including other services) may interact with it, but the service stands alone. The primary outcome of this view is that a service never trusts the data provided by any caller. I don t mean trust in just a security sense, but also trust in a semantic sense. Even data coming from an authenticated and authorized caller could be incorrect; either by accident or maliciously. A service always validates and recalculates data from external sources. Services are paranoid. Basing your services on business objects like those in this book works out well in this model, because all your business logic is in those objects. If the service merely provides an interface to the objects, then all the validation, calculation, and even authorization is automatically handled by the objects themselves.
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CHAPTER 11 s WEB SERVICES INTERFACE
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Message-Based Communication
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The other primary element of service orientation is that services communicate through messages. In short, this typically means that the method signature of a service-oriented web service looks like this: public ResponseMsg AddCustomer(RequestMsg request) ResponseMsg and RequestMsg are formally defined message data types that represent XML messages sent between the caller and the service. In many cases, the messages are defined by an XSD schema. Within a .NET application, however, the messages are almost always exposed as strongly typed proxy classes. So ResponseMsg might be defined like this: public class ResponseMsg { private bool _result; public bool Result { get { return _result; } set { _result = value; } } } Notice that this is just a really fancy or complex way of returning the same Boolean value that was returned in the component-based AddCustomer() web method. The benefit here is that the return type starts out as a complex, formally defined type. It is comparatively easy to add more return information to ResponseMsg than it would be to return more information from the previous AddCustomer() implementation. Similarly, RequestMsg would look something like this: public class RequestMsg { private int _id; public int Id { get { return _id; } set { _id = value; } } // other fields/properties go here } Again, this is just another way of packaging up all the parameters from the earlier AddCustomer() web method. And the benefit is the same; it is easier to add new elements to RequestMsg than to add them to the component-based model. Perhaps more important is the benefit to versioning. The component-based approach suffers from the same limitation as COM did, in that you can t change the API. If your parameters are all exposed individually, the odds of having to change the API to add or change elements over time is quite high. To do this, you ll almost certainly end up creating AddCustomer2() and AddCustomerEx() methods that sort of thing. With a service-oriented message-based model, you can just add extra optional elements to RequestMsg and ResponseMsg. The API never changes because the AddCustomer() method always accepts a single parameter and returns a single result. Again, both the component-based and service-oriented world-views are valid and useful in different scenarios. My goal here isn t to provide comprehensive coverage of SOA, SO, or even Web Services, as there are entire books on each of those topics. Rather, my goal is to provide you with some very basic background on the concepts before walking through the implementation of the web services to expose the ProjectTracker sample business objects.
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