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In addition, business objects will typically move across the network more efficiently than the DataSet. The approach in this book will use a binary transfer scheme that transfers data that is about 30 percent of the size of data transferred using the DataSet. Also, the business objects will contain far less metadata than the DataSet, further reducing the number of bytes transferred across the network.
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Effectively, you re sharing the Business layer between the machine running the Data Access layer and the machine running the Interface Control layer. As long as there is support for mobile objects, this is an ideal solution: it provides code reuse, low maintenance costs, and high performance.
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A New Logical Architecture
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Being able to access the Business layer from both the Data Access layer and the Interface Control layer directly opens up a new way to view the logical architecture. Though the Business layer remains a separate concept, it s directly used by and tied into both the Interface Control and Data Access layers, as shown in Figure 1-17.
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C HAPTE R 1 DISTRIBUTED A RCHITEC TURE
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Figure 1-17. The Business layer tied to the Interface Control and Data Access layers The Interface Control layer can interact directly with the objects in the Business layer, thereby relying on them to perform all validation, manipulation, and other processing of the data. Likewise, the Data Access layer can interact with the objects as the data is retrieved or stored. If all the layers are running on a single machine (such as a smart client), then these parts will run in a single process and interact with each other with no network or cross-processing overhead. In more distributed physical configurations, the Business layer will run on both the client and the application server, as shown in Figure 1-18.
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Figure 1-18. Business logic shared between the Interface Control and Data Access layers
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Local, Anchored, and Mobile Objects
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Normally, one might think of objects as being part of a single application, running on a single machine in a single process. A distributed application requires a broader perspective. Some of the objects might only run in a single process on a single machine. Others might run on one machine, but might be called by code running on another machine. Still others might be mobile objects, moving from machine to machine.
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Local Objects
By default, .NET objects are local. This means that ordinary .NET objects aren t accessible from outside the process in which they were created. Without taking extra steps in your code, it isn t possible to pass objects to another process or another machine (a procedure known as marshaling), either by value or by reference.
CHAPTER 1 DIS TRIBUTED ARC HITE CTURE
Anchored Objects
In many technologies, objects are always passed by reference. This means that when you pass an object from one machine or process to another, what actually happens is that the object remains in the original process, and the other process or machine merely gets a pointer, or reference, back to the object, as shown in Figure 1-19.
Figure 1-19. Calling an object by reference By using this reference, the other machine can interact with the object. Because the object is still on the original machine, however, any property or method calls are sent across the network, and the results are returned back across the network. This scheme is only useful if the object is designed so it can be used with very few method calls; just one is ideal. The recommended designs for Enterprise Services objects call for each method on the object to do all its work in a single method call for precisely this reason, thereby sacrificing proper objectoriented design in order to reduce latency. The same is effectively true for objects exposed to the network through WCF. Each method on a service object should do all its work, not relying on the client to have called other methods before or after calling this method. These types of objects are stuck, or anchored, on the original machine or process where they were created. An anchored object never moves; it s accessed via references. In .NET, you can create an anchored object in a couple different ways. If you re using WCF, the object will implement a service contract: [ServiceContract] public interface IMyService { [OperationContract] void MyOperation(); } public class MyServiceImplementation : IMyService { } If you re using the older .NET Remoting technology, you create an anchored object by having it inherit from MarshalByRefObject: public class MyAnchoredClass: MarshalByRefObject { } Either way, the .NET Framework takes care of the details. Code running in another process or on another machine across the network can call the anchored object.
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