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CHAPTER 6 WORKING WITH OBJECTS AND MODULES
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Adding Overloaded Operators
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Types can also include the definition of overloaded operators. Typically you do this simply by defining static members with the same names as the relevant operator. Here is an example: type Vector2DWithOperators(dx:float,dy:float) = member x.DX = dx member x.DY = dy static member (+) (v1: Vector2DWithOperators ,v2: Vector2DWithOperators) = Vector2DWithOperators(v1.DX + v2.DX, v1.DY + v2.DY) static member (-) (v1: Vector2DWithOperators ,v2: Vector2DWithOperators) = Vector2DWithOperators (v1.DX - v2.DX, v1.DY - v2.DY) > let v1 = new Vector2DWithOperators (3.0,4.0);; val v1 : Vector2DWithOperators > v1 + v1;; val it : Vector2DWithOperators = { DX=6.0; DY=8.0 } > v1 - v1;; val it : Vector2DWithOperators = { DX=0.0; DY=0.0 } If you add overloaded operators to your type, you may also have to customize how generic equality, hashing, and comparison are performed. In particular, the behavior of generic operators such as hash, <, >, <=, >=, compare, min, and max is not specified by defining new static members with these names, but rather by the techniques described in 8.
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HOW DOES OPERATOR OVERLOADING WORK
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Operator overloading in F# works by having fixed functions that map uses of operators through to particular static members on the static types involved in the operation. These functions are usually defined in the F# library. For example, the F# library includes the following definition for the (+) operator: let inline (+) x y = (^a: (static member (+) : ^a * ^b -> ^c) (x,y)) This defines the infix function (+) and is implemented using a special expression that says implement x + y by calling a static member (+) on the type of the left operand. The function is marked inline to ensure that F# can always check for the existence of this member and call it efficiently. The previous definition for (+) gives a certain asymmetry to this operator; the type of the left operator is more significant than the type of the right. Also, when you name a static member (+), then that is really just shorthand for the name op_Additon, which is the .NET standard encoded name for addition operators. You can also define your own operators if you want, but they will not be overloaded in the same way as the F# library definitions like the one shown previously. For example, the following defines a new infix operator that appends a single element to the end of a list:
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CH A PT ER 6 WO RKI NG WI TH O BJEC TS AN D M OD ULES
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let (++) x y = List.append x [y] However, this operator is not overloaded; it is a single fixed function. Defining non-overloaded operators can help make some implementation code more succinct, and we use this technique in the symbolic programming examples in 12. In principle, you can define new operators that are truly overloaded in the same way as the definition of (+) in the F# library, mapping the operator across to particular static members. However, code is much clearer if you just stick to the standard overloaded operators.
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Using Named and Optional Arguments
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The F# object-oriented constructs are designed largely for use in APIs for software components. Two useful mechanisms in APIs are to permit callers to name arguments and to let API designers make certain arguments optional. Named arguments are simple. For example, in Listing 6-2 the implementations of some methods specify arguments by name, as in the expression Vector2D(dx=dx+x, dy=dy). You can use named arguments with all dot-notation method calls. Code written using named arguments is often much more readable and maintainable than code relying on argument position. We will frequently use named arguments throughout the rest of this book. A member argument is declared optional by prefixing the argument name with . Within a function implementation, an optional argument always has an option<_> type; for example, an optional argument of type int will appear as a value of type option<int> within the function body. The value will be None if no argument is supplied by the caller and Some(arg) if the argument arg is given by the caller. For example: open System.Drawing type LabelInfo( text:string, font:Font) = let text = defaultArg text "" let font = match font with | None -> new Font(FontFamily.GenericSansSerif,12.0f) | Some v -> v member x.Text = text member x.Font = font The inferred signature for this type shows how the optional arguments have become named arguments accepting option values: type LabelInfo = new : text:string option * font:System.Drawing.Font option -> LabelInfo member Font : System.Drawing.Font member Text : string You can now create LabelInfo values using several different techniques:
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