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CHAPTER 5 DETAILED DESIGN AND UNIT TESTING
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Geek Alert In the movie Avatar, if you think of the way that the N avi connect to other creatures using their funny wiggly connector things, unit tests have a similar connection to the code: the unit test gets inside the code and controls it, telling it what to do and sensing both the before and after of each instruction; finally, the unit test readily disconnects from the code as soon as it s done.
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By contrast, in 6 you ll learn about controller tests that manipulate and read the code from the outside. Controller tests are also broader-grained than unit tests, and are a sort of halfway house between detailed design and the requirements in other worse, they test against the conceptual design. In that chapter we ll compare the two types of tests, and contrast the advantages and disadvantages of each. You ll find that each approach does have its place. You ll most likely want to use unit tests for complex algorithmic logic (more about this in 12), where you want the test to have an intimate knowledge and control over each miniscule state change that takes place in the code. Such code still benefits from being designed; so in this chapter we ll show how to drive unit tests from a detailed UML design. There are essentially two classes of unit tests: isolated tests (that is, where the code being tested is kept within a walled garden to keep it relevant to the particular test), and integration tests (where there are no walls, and the code is allowed to make calls to remote systems, or just to other parts of the same system). This chapter is chiefly about isolated unit tests, as these are the easier of the two to write and maintain. But integration unit tests, while they face more issues (due to the nature of what they re testing), are no less important. There will be more about these in 11. The chapter is structured around our top ten unit testing to do list.
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Top Ten Unit Testing To Do s
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When you re exploring your project s detailed design, writing the corresponding unit tests, and thinking about refactoring and code maintenance, be sure to follow our top ten to do items. 10. Start with a sequence diagram that shows how the code satisfies the behavior requirements from a use case. 9. 8. 7. 6. 5. 4. 3. 2. 1. Identify test cases from your design. Write test scenarios for each test case. Test smarter: avoid writing overlapping tests. Transform your test cases into UML test classes (and the test scenarios into unit test methods). Start to write the unit tests and the accompanying code. Write white box unit tests. Use a mock object framework to make life easier. Test algorithmic logic with unit tests. Write a separate suite of unit-level integration tests.
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CHAPTER 5 DETAILED DESIGN AND UNIT TESTING
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10. Start with a Sequence Diagram
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Different UML diagrams are intended for different stages of analysis and design. Sequence diagrams, for example, are best used to think through a detailed design, and, in particular, to allocate behavior (functions/methods) to classes. With proper object-oriented design, you start by defining domain classes which generally contain data and then you allocate behavior to these data classes, so that the classes encapsulate both data and functions.1 So, for example, when creating a ReservationDetail class with check-in and check-out dates, ReservationDetail would have at least two fields, checkInDate and checkOutDate, and during detailed design you might add the function checkDatesAreValid(), which performs a series of validation checks on the fields. To put it another way, if you want to track down some behavior related to a reservation, the first place in the code you d go to would be the ReservationDetail class. It s just good OO design to allocate behavior to the relevant domain class. As you might expect, allocating behavior is what sequence diagrams help you to do. And the added bonus is that this responsibility-driven approach to design also makes your code easier to unit test. Let s use the approach we ve just described to implement part of the Mapplet, complete with unit tests. The Mapplet requires an Advanced Search widget, which will allow the user to search for hotels using search fields such as city, check-in/check-out date, and so on. The user enters a search value and then clicks Find. The Flex client contacts the Java-based search service, which, in turn, calls out to an external, XML-based search system. The Java code then compiles the XML results into a HotelCollection, which it returns to the Flex client.
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Note We will walk through the Flex-based ReservationDetail example in 6, so for this chapter we ll look at server-side code, a Java class called SearchHotelService.
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Figure 5 1 shows the sequence diagram for the search request that we ve just described (this is, in fact, for the Advanced Search use case, which we will show more of in 6). It s pretty clear from the sequence diagram that SearchHotelService (our server-side Java class) needs a public method called getHotels() and a private method (called on itself) called getHotelsFromSearchService(). This second method is the one that makes an HTTP call to an external hotel search service, which returns its results in a big XML stream. But it s the public method, getHotels(), that we want to unit-test. We want to test how the Java code handles some hotels being returned, and also whether it copes with no hotels being returned.
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1 When we learned object-oriented design, this was actually the definition of a class... a programmatic unit that encapsulated data and functions, with said encapsulation having benefits like controlling the means of accessing a set of data. Nowadays it seems fashionable to have data classes (which have no behavior) and single-method classes (aka functions wearing class clothing). This seems like a giant step backwards to us, which obliterates all the (very real) benefits of doing an object-oriented design.
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