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Before we dive headfirst into the top ten to-do list, Figure 7 1 shows a quick overview of the use cases for the Mapplet 2.0 project. As you can see, they re organized into two packages: Displaying and Searching. We ll focus on the Use Address use case (in Searching) in this chapter.
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Figure 7 1. The Mapplet use cases, organized into two packages
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CHAPTER 7 ACCEPTANCE TESTING: EXPANDING USE CASE SCENARIOS
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10. Start with a Narrative Use Case
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Begin your testing with a use case written in narrative form. If you ve ever used software that s cumbersome, difficult to use, or doesn t seem to work quite right (and all of us have), you re almost certainly using software that didn t start out with somebody writing a good narrative user manual style use case. The easiest way to think about writing narrative style use cases is simply write the user manual before you write the code. Writing the user manual (in use case form) forces developers to think through the user experience in detail before the code gets written. This is important because once the code is written, it s usually too late.
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NARRATIVE USE CASES ARE STILL IMPORTANT
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The thought processes of analysis/design and testing are inherently different. The analysis/design thought process involves thinking through the user experience, while the testing thought process involves comprehensively making sure that all paths have been exercised during an independent QA process. In addition to the thought process being different, there s a difference in the level of time investment people are willing to make in testing vs. analysis/design. While this varies from organization to organization and project to project, with agile approaches like TDD, the trend has been closer and closer to 100% time investment in testing and 0% investment in analysis/design. Without going too deeply into the debate about what an optimal percentage might be, it s safe to say that any delays introduced into the analysis/design phase of a project (i.e., analysis paralysis) run a risk of having the analysis/design effort aborted. There s a lot of additional information required to prepare a use case for acceptance testing beyond the user manual view. Most notably, the use case s pre-conditions and post-conditions need to be specified so that an independent QA team can exercise the use case, and we need to specify where each alternate/exception path must rejoin the basic path in order to make sure we can generate all of the fully expanded threads for testing. Trying to specify this information during analysis/design while we re still trying to understand the user experience completely can be a major distraction, and can slow down the process of writing the use cases in other words, we increase the risk of analysis paralysis. We also need to define one or more sets of data that will be used in the testing, and the choice of the data sets can determine how extensively the test covers the scenarios, especially the rainy days. Conversely, the scenarios (sunny and rainy day) drive the need for test data. So our process in this book is to use narrative use cases during analysis/design, and then transform them for the purposes of testing, using the techniques described in this chapter.
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There s plenty of detail on how to write good ICONIX style narrative use cases in Use Case Driven Object Modeling with UML: Theory and Practice, but for now we ll just assume we have one in this case, the Mapplet s Use Address use case:
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CHAPTER 7 ACCEPTANCE TESTING: EXPANDING USE CASE SCENARIOS
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BASIC COURSE:
The user types an address using all address fields on the Quick Search window. The system enables the Locate button as soon as an entry is made in either one of these fields: City, State, Postal, Country. The user clicks Locate. The system geocodes the location based on the level of detail provided by the user and stores any candidates in an Address Candidate Collection. If a single candidate is found or exactly one of the multiple candidates has a 100% match rate, the system sets the AOI based on this Address Candidate.
ALTERNATE COURSES:
The user clicks Clear : Entries in any fields will be cleared. Multiple valid candidates found: The system displays an Address Candidate widget with a list of potential candidates to choose from. The user selects an Address Candidate. No candidates found: The system displays a message Location not found.
Figure 7 2 shows the use case narrative in our EA model. We wrote the narrative text in the General tab of the use case specification dialog. To help visualize the use case, the development team at ESRI created the storyboards shown in Figures 7 3 (the basic course) and 7 4 (the alternate course, Multiple valid candidates found ).
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