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CHAPTER 17 ARCHITECTURE
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Network bandwidth and latency: How the different components communicate with each other Hardware requirements, performance, and response times of the different components: Where and what is executed, where data resides, and how it s read and written to persistent storage How to secure your system and data: A combination of the first set of points
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Applications, Clients, and Servers
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Axapta started as a client/server system, from which it evolved into a multitier system. This evolution was not achieved by redesigning the client/server architecture, but by creating a new multitier system that can coexist with the original client/server architecture. This means that Axapta has two architectures. You can choose the one that best suits your needs, or you can leverage both simultaneously depending on what best fits the needs of specific user groups, functions, and geographical locations within your organization. When Axapta was installed, only the application and the client components were required. These are the components necessary for deploying Axapta in the simplest mode that is, in a client/server setup commonly designated as 2-tier. At the same time, the Axapta Object Server (AOS) 3-tier mode also was installed. Axapta was started in 2-tier mode to set it up, and after this initial setup we switched to 3-tier mode.
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Caution It s very important to remember the peculiarity of Axapta s mixing of architectures. You must always set up and start Axapta in 2-tier mode the first time after you have installed it, even if you do not plan to deploy it in 2-tier mode.
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2-Tier Setup
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The Axapta 2-tier setup includes the following components: Application: This is where all the business logic and metadata definitions reside form, report, menu definitions, etc. Client: This is where the application is executed and the interaction with the end user is handled. Database: This is where all business and system data is persisted. As you can see, you are now looking at three components. What about the 2-tier mode In practice and from a runtime viewpoint, the client reads the application definitions from the files typically placed on a dedicated Application File Server and handles user interaction (the presentation logic) and executes the application code in its memory space (the business logic layer). The combination of the two makes up a tier. The database executes in another memory space and constitutes the second tier. Notice that the client interacts directly with the database tier. This deployment configuration is commonly known as a client/server architecture, which is shown in Figure 17-1.
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CHAPTER 17 ARCHITECTURE
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Figure 17-1. 2-tier setup
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Note Clients in 2-tier setups are generally designated as fat clients, meaning that they handle both the
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presentation and the business logic.
3-Tier Setup
3-tier setups are somewhat more complex and come with some interesting twists, so let s look at what they are made of: Application: This is where all the business logic and metadata definitions reside form, report, menu definitions, etc. Application Object Server: This is where the application is executed and data access is performed in thin mode. Client: This is where interaction with the end user is handled and data access is performed in fat mode. Database: This is where all business and system data is persisted.
CHAPTER 17 ARCHITECTURE
We have already determined that the number of tiers has to do with how many independent memory spaces the whole thing executes in, and not the number of components. That is, the application layer no longer executes in the memory space of the client but of a new component, the AOS. Figure 17-2 illustrates this type of architecture.
Figure 17-2. 3-tier thin mode setup
Note In a 3-tier fat-mode setup, the client would communicate directly with the database server instead
of using the AOS.
CHAPTER 17 ARCHITECTURE
What makes 3-tier setups interesting in Axapta is the fact that the clients can be of two types: Fat client: The AOS executes the application on behalf of the client; however, the client directly accesses the database. Thin client: The AOS executes the application on behalf of the client and also brokers all access to the database for clients. In practice, 3-tier mode is either real 3-tier mode or a 2.5-tier mode, depending on the type of client you select. The latter (or 2.5-tier fat client) theory is that allowing the client to access the database directly off-loads processing to clients instead of hammering your servers, and consequently improves system performance. See Figure 17-3.
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