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CHAPTER 7: Client Management
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referred to as workgroups. The other levels are simply referred to as managed users, managed computers, and managed computer groups.
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Figure 7-1. Managed preferences overview
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In Mac OS X 10.4, computer groups were nonexistent. Preceding them were computer lists, now deprecated except for basic policy management and otherwise functionally equivalent. Computer lists are limited in two crucial ways. They cannot be nested and computers could only be a member of a single list, a limitation particularly cumbersome in larger environments. One noteworthy computer list-based feature of 10.4 was the guest computer list. The guest computer list was used to manage any computer, which was configured with an untrusted bind to an LDAP domain and didn t have a unique computer record with the appropriate Ethernet address. This is a fairly common occurrence in loosely managed environments, and the presence of this catchall computer-level management list was very useful. This functionality still exists in 10.5 and 10.6, but is implemented as a single computer record, the guest computer. The guest computer can be found under the computers tab of WGM, but is not available until
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explicitly created. To do so, there is a nifty Create Guest Computer menu item found under the Server menu in Workgroup manager. Certain management settings are not available at the user and workgroup levels. These management levels apply to active user sessions, so settings outside of this purview, such as login scripts, energy saver settings, and login window preferences are only managed on the computer and computer group levels. Time Machine settings are another noteworthy management capability only applicable on the computer level. On the flip side, the computer-oriented management levels do not share the same deficit---they have access to the entire purview of applicable management. Because of this, having a well structured and populated managed preferences paradigm that includes users, groups, and computers is highly recommended.
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One key feature of MCX behavior to understand is the way that managed preferences are determined when managed on multiple levels. Apple defines three different managed preference behaviors, referred to as preference interactions, which determine the resultant policy from multiple levels of management. Overriding preference interactions refer scenarios where two different levels manage the same domain, each explicitly providing conflicting settings. In these cases, OS X prioritizes management levels, as shown in Figure 7-2.
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Figure 7-2. Account types election in Workgroup Manager
This works out well for the most part, although there are a few ramifications to discuss. Most important, managed preferences applied at the user level will be the dominant preference, persisting for that user in any environment that they log in to, despite any computer or computer list managed preferences that are applied. After this, you have
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CHAPTER 7: Client Management
computer and computer groups taking precedence over workgroups. This proves to be beneficial in lab or kiosk environments where the nodes are typically special usage and may need specific configurations. Workgroups, though the lowest on the totem pole, will be your primary application point. The granularity of user-based management is both a blessing and a curse. While it s great to ensure VIP status for certain users and implement further managed preferences for problem users, it also becomes a management nightmare in medium-to-large environments where a number of policies overlap on a given object due to a combination of users, groups, computers, and computer groups. Another form of interaction is referred to as combined interactions. Some examples of these include printers, login items, and dock items. In a combined interaction scenario, preferences from all of the different levels are aggregate. Therefore, if you have a login item deployed for a specific user and a login item deployed for a group the user is in, then both login items will take effect when the user logs in. Inherited interactions are the third type of preference interaction, and simply refer to a managed preference that is only managed at a single level. NOTE: Introduced with 10.5 was the ability to combine preferences across groups. In 10.4, users would be prompted to select a workgroup upon login, and solely that workgroup s preferences would be applied. With 10.5 and later, you can define settings across multiple workgroups. When a user logs in, and is a member of multiple workgroups, they can be configured to receive the combined policies of those two groups. This was a big boon, as it simplified the management of complex hierarchies, particularly opening up the ability to apply management across nested workgroups. The ability still remains to mimic the 10.4 behavior, if needed.
For the most part, standard preference interactions apply when combining workgroup management. However, an obvious conflict presents itself: When an overriding preference interaction occurs between two groups how is precedence determined In the case of nested groups, where one of the conflicting groups is a member of the other, the child-most group will override its parents. That is, if GroupA is nested inside of GroupB, GroupB s managed preferences will be applied. If the conflicting groups are independent, the unfortunate answer is that there is no way to explicitly set precedence in such an event----the resulting preference will be determined from the first group sorted alphabetically. This typically shouldn t be a problem, as a properly structured system should avoid conflicting group settings. If the situation is absolutely unavoidable, one option available is to utilize computer access lists, which serve as a handy filter for workgroup-based management. At this point, you may wonder how it is possible to determine the type of interaction that will be applied to a managed preference. The answer is actually a little more straightforward than may be expected. In fact, the answer will be fairly obvious. Any preference, which has a single definitive setting, will result in an override scenario. There
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