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Validate Account: Click this button to verify that the LDAPv3 service is
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CHAPTER 4: Storage
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Figure 4-26. Settings Dialog of ExtremeZ-IP Administrator Tool, File Servers tab
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When you ve applied your settings, select the Search tab if you wish to enable Spotlight support, then choose the Filename Policy tab if you want to customize file names that ExtremeZ-IP will allow for files and directories on the server. Now click on the Service Discovery tab. You ll be looking at the screen shown in Figure 4-27. Here, you can adjust the settings for Bonjour, AppleTalk (likely not needed unless you have Mac OS 9 clients) and Zidget/HTTP support, which configures the client to access the wide-area Bonjour implementation on ExtremeZ-IP.
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Figure 4-27. Settings Dialog of ExtremeZ-IP Administrator Tool, Service Discovery tab
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CHAPTER 4: Storage
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Setting up DFS in ExtremeZ-IP
GroupLogic has a great explanation of how you get a Mac client to use ExtremeZ-IP. You ll find it in a technical whitepaper that documents the installation and configuration process. To get the paper, go to http://www.grouplogic.com/resourcecenter/pdfs/How-Microsoft-DFS-Home-Directories-Work-w-ExtremeZ-IP-60-ATechnical-White-Paper.pdf.
Managing Filesystem Permissions in OS X
There s a lot of misinformation and confusion surrounding the proper management of permissions in OS X. Discussion of the topic have been fairly heated since the migration from OS 9, which had very loose capabilities for delegating, assigning, and managing rights. OS X, in contrast was a native multiuser OS, and as such, it had permissionbased restrictions in its heart and soul. Admins doing migrations panic d, mass chaos ensued, and suddenly all you heard were complaints about permissions problems. Granted, in the early days, dealing with rights in OS X was a bit of a nightmare, but the situation is much better now. There s no reason why a modern-day environment running 10.5 or 10.6 should continue to be plagued by permissions problems. Grasping the two main OS X discretionary access control (DAC) systems is paramount to a proper understanding of OS X permissions.
POSIX-Based Permissions
OS X inherited its POSIX-compliant permissioning from its Unix progenitors. POSIX is a long-standing system, in both Unix and Linux, for defining the owner, group, and mode of a file. The mode, presented through a series of numeric values, represents the permissions of the file. Using POSIX, you can apply access restrictions at three different levels: that of the owner, of the group, and of everyone else. Each levels has three possible access capabilities, represented by three different modes: read, write, and execute. Each level has a numerical mode value, which determines its respective access rights. POSIX uses three-bit flags to represent modes, thus a numerical value denotes each mode. In most-significant to least-significant bit order, a 1 in each position gives read, write, and execute permission. Put another way, read s binary and decimal values are 100 and 4, write s are 010 and 2, and execute s are 001 and 1. Thus, a user with full access has a mode of 111 binary and 7 (4+2+1) decimal. Numbering by sets of 3 bits (which can represent the 8 decimal digits 0 through 7) is called octal notation. You don t really need to know the binary system, but knowing the numeric values of each mode is important. Each level: user, group, and everyone, has a mode represented by an integer value based on these three bits.
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CHAPTER 4: Storage
For example, consider the list of files and directories in the /Users folder that the command ls al /Users produces:
helyx:~ hunterbj$ ls -al /Users total 0 drwxr-xr-x 10 root admin 340 Jul 1 20:22 . drwxrwxr-t@ 51 root admin 1802 Jul 7 00:58 .. drwxrwxrwt 13 root wheel 442 Jun 29 23:54 Shared drwxrwxr-x+ 20 demo admin 680 May 29 18:15 demo drwxr-xr-x+ 55 hunterbj staff 1870 Jul 8 00:57 hunterbj
In every line of the output, the first field (the one containing combinations of dashes and the letters d, r, t, w, and x) reports the POSIX permissions, as laid out in a bitmap. Rather than using 1 s or 0 s though, it displays identifiers (the dashes and some of the letters) for each permission attribute. Let s look at the line that contains the word demo twice:
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