print barcode in asp.net c# 9: Enforcing Managed Preferences in Font

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CHAPTER 9: Enforcing Managed Preferences
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You may be tempted to manage everything Always or Often. But consider that, while well-intentioned, your ideas of the right configuration might not be optimal for all users in your organization. Manage only what you need to, and as infrequently as you can.
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Enforcing the Managed Preferences Configuration
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When managed preferences data is coming from a network directory, it can be very difficult or counterproductive for users to circumvent the management of client preferences. If a user has admin rights on a local machine, the obvious way to disable preference management is to reconfigure the machine to no longer use the network directory service. Presumably, this would also keep the user from using any network resources, so the downside of doing this probably makes it unattractive to mischiefmakers. However, there are more advanced methods available to administrative users that involve editing directory service mappings for LDAP directories that could effectively turn off preference management for a client. With a magic triangle or "dual directory" setup, administrative users could determine which directory service is supplying managed preferences information, and remove that directory from the search path. This would maintain access to user and group information from the primary directory, so this might actually be attractive to a miscreant.
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CHAPTER 9: Enforcing Managed Preferences
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If the managed preferences data is kept in a local directory node, a user with administrative rights might be able to use Workgroup Manager to directly change or remove managed preferences settings. At the very least, a user with administrative rights could delete the local files that are the source of the managed preferences data. So if you really, truly need to enforce certain preferences for security or company policy reasons, you need to protect your machines from having the source of managed preferences removed or altered. NOTE: Protecting the managed preferences configuration is really just a subset of the larger issue of securing the machines for which you are responsible. To truly cover all the issues and approaches to securing managed machines would require another book. Ultimately, your managed preferences configuration is only as secure as the rest of the administrator-protected data on your machines.
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Protecting Your Managed Preference Configuration
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The simplest way to protect your managed preferences configuration is to never give admin rights to regular users. This prevents a user from making changes to the Directory Service configuration, and from removing any local files that contain managed preferences data. This also prevents the user from doing a host of other things that are contrary to security best practices, completely separate from managed preferences. This is your first, best line of defense. This is not complete protection, as a truly malicious user might still be able to gain administrative or root access, especially on machines that are not physically secured, but it is an important first step. Unfortunately, it is not always possible to withhold admin rights from all of your users. There are always those users who may insist on administrative rights on their machines, and for political or organizational reasons, you must acquiesce. Or, you may have users who, due to their job requirements, must be able to install or reconfigure software on their machines. With any luck, though, those to whom you must give admin rights can be trusted not to intentionally circumvent security measures. That leaves the possibility of administrative users accidentally or inadvertently breaking managed preferences, by playing around with Directory Utility or Workgroup Manager, or even by deleting files from /Library/Preferences/ DirectoryService, or the local directory service store in /private/var/db/dslocal. You ll need to decide if it s worth the effort to implement a method of ensuring the configuration that delivers your managed preferences is preserved. Here are a few ideas and methods to pursue if you need this level of enforcement.
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