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<description>Large tweedy hat looking like an unappealing strawberry </description>
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Note that garments are automatically added to our array of all garments as they are created, simply by invoking the constructor. Removing a garment from the array is also relatively straightforward:
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function unregisterGarment(id){ garments[id]=null; }
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This removes the garment type from the global registry, but won t cascade to destroy any instances of Garment that we have already created. We can add a simple validation test to the Garment object, however:
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Garment.prototype.isValid=function(){ return garments[this.id]!=null; }
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We ve now defined a clear path for propagating data all the way from the database to the client, with nice, easy-to-handle objects at each step. Let s recap the steps. First, we generate a server-side object model from the database. In section 3.4.2, we saw how to do this using an Object-Relational Mapping (ORM) tool, which gave us out-of-the-box two-way interactions between object model and database. We can read data into objects, modify it, and save the data. Second, we used a template system to generate an XML stream from our object model, and third, we parsed this stream in order to create an object model on the JavaScript tier. We must do this parsing by hand for now. We may see ORM-like mapping libraries appearing in the near future. In an administrative application, of course, we might want to edit our data too, that is, modify the JavaScript model, and then communicate these changes back to the server model. This forces us to confront the issue that we now have two copies of our domain model and that they may get out of sync with each other. In a classic web application, all the intelligence is located on the server, so our model is located there, in whatever language we re using. In an Ajax application, we want to distribute the intelligence between the client and the server, so that the client code can make some decisions for itself before calling back to the server. If the client makes only very simple decisions, we can code these in an ad hoc way, but then we won t get much of the benefit of an intelligent client, and the system will tend to still be unresponsive in places. If we empower the client to make more important decisions for itself, then it needs to know something about our business domain, at which point it really needs to have a model of the domain. We can t do away with the domain model on the server, because some resources are available only on the server, such as database connections for persistence,
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access to legacy systems, and so on. The client-side domain model has to work with the one on the server. So, what does that entail In chapter 5 we will develop a fuller understanding of the client/server interactions and how to work cleanly with a domain model split across both tiers. So far we ve looked at Model, View, and Controller in isolation. The final topic for this chapter brings the Model and View together again.
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4.5 Generating the View from the Model
By introducing MVC into the browser, we ve given ourselves three distinct subsystems to worry about. Separating concerns may result in cleaner code, but it can also result in a lot of code, and a common critique of design patterns is that they can turn even the simplest task into quite an involved process (as Enterprise JavaBeans [EJB] developers know only too well!). Many-layered application designs often end up repeating information across several layers. We know the importance of DRY code, and a common way of tackling this repetition is to define the necessary information once, and generate the various layers automatically from that definition. In this section, we ll do just that, and present a technique that simplifies the MVC implementation and brings together all three tiers in a simple way. Specifically, we ll target the View layer. So far, we ve looked at the View as a hand-coded representation of the underlying Model. This gives us considerable flexibility in determining what the user sees, but at times, we won t need this flexibility, and hand-coding the UI can become tedious and repetitive. An alternative approach is to automatically generate the user interface, or at least portions of it, from the underlying Model. There are precedents for doing this, such as the Smalltalk language environments and the Java/.NET Naked Objects framework (see the Resources section), and JavaScript is well suited to this sort of task. Let s have a look at what JavaScript reflection can do for us in this regard, and develop a generic Object Browser component, that can be used as a View for any JavaScript object that we throw at it.
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