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Coding the server side
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represents a major challenge, and one that the client can t solve on its own. We ll look at ways of writing data to the server in section 5.5 and present a solution to this problem based on one of the patterns that we encountered in chapter 3. We can deliver the client application and talk to the client in several ways, as you will see in this chapter. Is one way better than the others Do any particular combinations support each other Can they be mixed and matched How do the different solutions work with legacy server frameworks and architectures To answer these questions, a vocabulary for describing our various options will be useful. And that s exactly what we re going to develop in this chapter. First, let s look at the way the server is set up in a web application, and how Ajax affects that.
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5.2 Coding the server side
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In a conventional web application, the server side tends to be a rather complex place, controlling and monitoring the user s workflow through the application and maintaining conversational state. The application is designed for a particular language, and set of conventions, that will determine what it can and can t do. Languages may in themselves be tied to specific architectures, operating systems, or hardware. Picking a programming environment is a big choice to make, so let s discuss the options available to us.
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5.2.1 Popular implementation languages
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Server-side programming is dominated by a handful of languages. Over the very brief course of Internet history, fashions in server-side languages have changed remarkably. The current kings of the hill are PHP, Java, and classic ASP, with ASP.NET and Ruby growing in popularity too. These names are undoubtedly familiar to most readers, so I won t try to explain what they are here. Ajax is primarily a client-side technology and can interoperate with any of these languages. Indeed, some ways of working with Ajax downplay the importance of the serverside language considerably, making it easy to port Ajax applications from one server platform to another. Web frameworks are in many ways more important to Ajax than the implementation language. Web frameworks carry assumptions with them, about how the application is structured and where key responsibilities lie. Most frameworks have been designed for building classic web applications, and assumptions about the lifecycles of these which are very different from those of an Ajax app may be problematic in places. We ll look at server-side designs and frameworks in the
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The role of the server
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following section, but first, let s review the basic principles of web-based architectures, in order to lay the groundwork for that discussion.
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5.2.2 N-tier architectures
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A core concept in distributed applications is that of the tier. A tier often represents a particular set of responsibilities for an application, but it also describes a subsystem that can be physically isolated on a particular machine or process. This distinguishes it from the roles in MVC, for example. Model, View, and Controller aren t tiers because they typically sit in the same process. Early distributed systems consisted of a client tier and a server tier. The client tier was a desktop program using a network socket library to communicate to the server. The server tier was typically a database server. Similarly, early web systems consisted of a browser talking to a web server, a monolithic system on the network sending files from the filesystem. As web-based applications became more complex and began to require access to databases, the two-tier model of client/server was applied to the web server to create a three-tier model, with the web server mediating between the web browser client and the database. Later refinements on the model saw a further separation of the middle tier into presentation and business roles, either as distinct processes or as a more modular software design within a single process. Modern web applications typically have two principal tiers. The business tier models the business domain, and talks directly to the database. The presentation tier takes data from the business tier and presents it to the user. The browser acts as a dumb client in this setup. The introduction of Ajax can be considered to be the development of a further client tier, separating the presentation tier s traditional responsibilities of workflow and session management between the web server and the client (figure 5.1).
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